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Theory and Society

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 53–63 | Cite as

The poverty of organizational theory: Comment on: “Bourdieu and organizational analysis”

  • Frank Dobbin
Article

Abstract

American organizational theorists have not taken up the call to apply Bourdieu’s approach in all of its richness in part because, for better or worse, evidentiary traditions render untenable the kind of sweeping analysis that makes Bourdieu’s classics compelling. Yet many of the insights found in Bourdieu are being pursued piecemeal, in distinct paradigmatic projects that explore the character of fields, the emergence of organizational habitus, and the changing forms of capital that are key to the control of modern organizations. A number of these programs build on the same sociological classics that Bourdieu built his own theory on. These share the same lineage, even if they were not directly influenced by Bourdieu.

Keywords

Organizational Scholar Network Theorist Structural Constraint Symbolic Capital Resource Dependence Theorist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I thank Michele Lamont for comments.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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