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Research on Chemical Intermediates

, Volume 44, Issue 7, pp 4533–4546 | Cite as

Investigation the catalytic activity of nanofibrillated and nanobacterial cellulose sulfuric acid in synthesis of dihydropyrimidoquinolinetriones

  • Kobra Nikoofar
  • Hannaneh Heidari
  • Yeganeh Shahedi
Article

Abstract

Two novel types of nanocellulose-based catalyst, viz. nanofibrillated cellulose sulfuric acid (s-NFC) and nanobacterial cellulose sulfuric acid (s-BC), were prepared by a simple method and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction anlaysis, and nitrogen adsorption measurements. The catalytic activity of these two bio-based solid acid catalysts was examined in a one-pot, four-component coupling reaction of barbituric acid, dimedone, aryl aldehydes, and (hetero)aromatic amines in refluxing ethanol. The results confirmed that s-BC promoted the speed of the mentioned reaction more than s-NFC. The recovery and reusability of the degradable nanostructures showed that they could be used in at least three runs without loss of activity.

Keywords

Nanofibrillated cellulose Bacterial cellulose Dihydropyrimidoquinolinetriones Four-component reaction Dimedone Barbituric acid 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The researchers greatly appreciate the Research of Alzahra University for their financial support of this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Physics and ChemistryAlzahra UniversityVanak, TehranIran

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