Advertisement

Research in Higher Education

, Volume 47, Issue 7, pp 801–822 | Cite as

Students’ Personality Types, Intended Majors, and College Expectations: Further Evidence Concerning Psychological and Sociological Interpretations of Holland’s Theory

  • Gary R. PikeEmail author
Article

Abstract

Because it focuses on the interactions between students and their environments, Holland’s theory of vocational choice provides a powerful framework for studying college experiences. The present study assessed the relative merits of psychological and sociological interpretations of Holland’s theory by examining the relationships among students’ expectations about college, their personality types, and their intended academic majors. Results indicated that both the psychological and sociological aspects of Holland’s theory aid in understanding students’ college expectations.

KEYWORDS

Holland’s theory personality types academic disciplines college expectations 

References

  1. Astin A. W. (1970). The methodology of research on college impact (I). Sociology of Education 43:223–254CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baker R. W., McNeil O. V., Siryk B. (1985). Expectation and reality in freshman adjustment to college. Journal of Counseling Psychology 32:94–103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Berdie R. F. (1966). College expectations, experiences, and perceptions. Journal of College Student Personnel 7:336–344Google Scholar
  4. Berdie R. F. (1968). Changes in university perceptions during the first two years. Journal of College Student Personnel 9:85–89Google Scholar
  5. Braxton J. M., Vesper N., Hossler D. (1995). Expectations for college and student persistence. Research in Higher Education 36:595–612CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Feldman K. A., Ethington C. A., Smart J. C. (2001). A further investigation of major field and person-environment fit: Sociological versus psychological interpretations of Holland’s theory. Journal of Higher Education 72:670–698CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Feldman K. A., Newcomb T. M. (1969). The Impact of College Students. Jossey-Bass, San FranciscoGoogle Scholar
  8. Feldman K. A., Smart J. C., Ethington C. A. (1999). Major field and person-environment fit: Using Holland’s theory to study change and stability of college students. Journal of Higher Education 70:642–669CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Gottfredson L. S., Richards J. M., Jr. (1999). The meaning and measurement of environments in Holland’s theory. Journal of Vocational Behavior 55:57–73CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hackett G., Lent R. W. (1992). Theoretical advances and current inquiry in career psychology. In: Brown S. D., Lent R. W. (eds) Handbook of Counseling Psychology (2nd ed). John Wiley, New York, pp. 419–451Google Scholar
  11. Hanson G. R. (1974). Assessing the Career Interests of College Youth: Summary of Research and Applications (ACT Research Report, No. 67). American College Testing Program, Iowa City, IAGoogle Scholar
  12. Herr E. L. (1971). Student needs, college expectations, and “reality” perceptions. Journal of Educational Research 65:51–56Google Scholar
  13. Holland J. L. (1973). Making Vocational Choices: A Theory of Careers. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJGoogle Scholar
  14. Holland J. L. (1985). Making Vocational Choices: A Theory of Vocational Personalities and Work Environments (2nd ed). Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJGoogle Scholar
  15. Holland J. L. (1997). Making Vocational Choices: A Theory of Vocational Personalities and Work Environments (3r ed). Psychological Assessment Resources, Lutz FLGoogle Scholar
  16. Howard J. A., (2005). Why should we care about student expectations?. In: Miller T. E., Bender B. E., Schuh J. H. & Associates (eds), Promoting Reasonable Expectations: Aligning Student and Institutional Views of the College Experience. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, pp. 10–33Google Scholar
  17. Jackson L. M., Pancer S. M., Pratt M. W., Hunsberger B. E. (2000). Great expectations: The relation between expectations and adjustment during the transition to university. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 30:2100–2125CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. King H., Walsh W. B. (1972). Change in environmental expectations and perceptions. Journal of College Student Personnel 13:331–337Google Scholar
  19. Kuh G. D. (1991). The role of admissions and orientation in creating appropriate expectations for college life. College and University 66:75–82Google Scholar
  20. Kuh G. D. (1999). Setting the bar high to promote student learning. In: Blimling G., Whitt E. (eds) Good Practice in Student Affairs: Principles That Foster Student Learning. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, pp. 67–89Google Scholar
  21. Kuh G. D., Gonyea R. M., Williams J. M. (2005). What students expect from college and what they get. In: Miller T. E., Bender B. E., Schuh J. H. & Associates (eds) Promoting Reasonable Expectations: Aligning Student and Institutional Views of the College Experience. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, pp. 34–64Google Scholar
  22. Kuh G. D., Pace C. R. (1999). College Student Expectations Questionnaire (2d ed). Indiana University, Bloomington, INGoogle Scholar
  23. Mayo M. W., Christenfeld N. (1999). Gender, race, and performance expectations of college students. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development 27:93–104Google Scholar
  24. Moos R. H. (1976). The human context: Environmental determinants of behavior. John Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  25. Olsen, D., Kuh, G. D., Schilling, K. M., Schilling, K., Connolly, M., Simmons A., and Vesper N. (1998, November). Great expectations: What first-year students say they will do and what they actually do. In: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education, Miami, FL.Google Scholar
  26. Osipow S. H. (1983). Theories of Career Development (3rd ed). Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJGoogle Scholar
  27. Pace C. R., Stern G. G. (1958). An approach to the measurement of psychological characteristics of college environments. Journal of Educational Psychology 49:269–277CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Pascarella E. T., Terenzini P. T. (1991). How College Affects Students: Findings and Insights from Twenty Years of Research. Jossey-Bass, San FranciscoGoogle Scholar
  29. Pascarella E. T., Terenzini P. T. (2005). How College Affects Students: A Third Decade of Research (2nd ed). Jossey-Bass, San FranciscoGoogle Scholar
  30. Pate R. H., Jr. (1970). Student expectations and later expectations of a university enrollment. Journal of College Student Personnel 11:458–462Google Scholar
  31. Pike, G. R. (2006). Vocational preferences and college expectations: An extension of Holland’s principle of self-selection. Research in Higher Education 47, DOI: 10.1007/s11162-005-9008-x, February 10, 2006Google Scholar
  32. Risch T. J. (1970). Expectations for the college environment. Journal of College Student Personnel 11:463–466Google Scholar
  33. Rosen D., Holmberg K., Holland J. L. (1989). The College Majors Finder, Psychological Assessment Resources, Odessa, FLGoogle Scholar
  34. Rosenthal R., Rosnow R. L. (1991), Essentials of Behavioral Research: Methods and Data Analysis. McGraw-Hill, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  35. Schoggen P. (1989). Behavior Settings: A Revision and Extension of Roger G. Barker’s Ecological Psychology. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CAGoogle Scholar
  36. Shaw K. A. (1968). Accuracy of expectation of a university’s environment as it relates to achievement, attrition, and change of degree objective. Journal of College Student Personnel 9:44–48Google Scholar
  37. Smart J. C. (1985). Holland environments as reinforcement systems. Research in Higher Education 23:279–292CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Smart J. C. (1989). Life history influences on Holland vocational type development. Journal of Vocational Behavior 34:69–87CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Smart J. C., Feldman K. A. (1998). “Accentuation effects” of dissimilar academic departments: An application and exploration of Holland’s theory. Research in Higher Education 39:385–418CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Smart J. C., Feldman K. A., Ethington C. A. (2000). Academic Disciplines: Holland’s Theory and the Study of College Students and Faculty. Vanderbilt University Press, Nashville, TNGoogle Scholar
  41. Terenzini P. T., Pascarella E. T. (1991). Twenty years of research on college students: Lessons for future research. Research in Higher Education 32:83–92CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Walsh W. B., Holland J. L. (1992). A theory of personality types and work environments. In: Walsh W. B., Craik K. H., Price R. H. (eds) Person–environment Psychology: Models and Perspectives. Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, pp. 35–69Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Director, Office of Institutional ResearchMississippi State UniversityMississippi StateUSA

Personalised recommendations