Variations Between Latino Groups in us Post-Secondary Educational Attainment*

Abstract

Hispanics/Latinos are the fastest growing minority group in the US, and represent a diverse variety of ethnic groups with unique heritages. Yet educational and social research often analyzes this group in aggregate. This research, employing 1980 high school senior longitudinal data from the High School and Beyond project, demonstrates substantial differences in post-secondary educational attainment between some Hispanic/Latino groups. Net of a number of individual, socio-economic, family and high school background variables, logit analysis shows that Mexican Americans are significantly below others in post-secondary educational attainment after high school. The results are discussed in regard to future research adopting analysis of individual Hispanic/Latino groups rather than employing the aggregate measure which can substantially misrepresent the relationship between component Latino/a groups and educational attainment.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. E. Ballesteros (1986) Do Hispanics receive an equal educational opportunity? The relationship of school outcomes, family background, and high school curriculum M. Olivas (Eds) Latino College Students Teachers College Press New York 47–70

    Google Scholar 

  2. M. Barrera (1997) A Theory of Racial Inequality A. Darder R. Torres H. Gutierrez (Eds) Latinos and Education: a Critical Reader Routledge New York 3–44

    Google Scholar 

  3. A. E. Bayer (1972) ArticleTitleConstruction of a race item for survey research Public Opinion Quarterly 36 IssueID4 592–602 Occurrence Handle10.1086/268042

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. J. Battle M. S. Barbara (2000) ArticleTitleMother-only versus father-only households: educational outcomes for African American males Journal of African American Men 5 IssueID2 93–116

    Google Scholar 

  5. Bean, F. D., Stephen, J. T., Capps, R., and Tyler, M. (2001). The Latino Middle Class: Myth, Reality and Potential. Special report prepared for the Thomas Rivera Policy Institute, 48 pp

  6. T. J. Biblarz A. E. Raftery (1999) ArticleTitleFamily structure, educational attainment, and socioeconomic success: rethinking the ‘pathology of matriarchy’ American Journal of Sociology 105 IssueID2 321–365 Occurrence Handle10.1086/210314

    Article  Google Scholar 

  7. M. Blaug (1976) ArticleTitleThe empirical status of human capital theory: a slightly jaundiced survey Journal of Economic Literature 14 IssueID3 827–855

    Google Scholar 

  8. G. W. Bohrnstedt D. Knoke (1994) Statistics for Social and Data Analysis EditionNumber3 F.E. Peacock Publishers Itasca, Illinois

    Google Scholar 

  9. N. D. Brener L. Kann T. McManus (2003) ArticleTitleA comparison of two survey questions on race and ethnicity among high school students Public Opinion Quarterly 67 IssueID2 227–236 Occurrence Handle10.1086/374401

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. P. J. Burke (1989) ArticleTitleGender identity, sex, and school performance Social Psychology Quarterly 52 IssueID2 159–169

    Google Scholar 

  11. A. Darder R. Torres H. Gutierrez (1997) Introduction A. Darder R. Torres H. Gutierrez (Eds) Latinos and Education: a Critical Reader Routledge New York xi–xix

    Google Scholar 

  12. R. Fry (2004) Latino Youth Finishing College: The Role of Selective Pathways Pew Charitable Trusts Hispanic Center Washington

    Google Scholar 

  13. E. F. Garcia (2001) Hispanic Education in the United States: Raices y Alas Rowman and Littlefield New York

    Google Scholar 

  14. M. T. Hallinan (1994) ArticleTitleSchool differences in tracking effects on achievement Social Forces 72 IssueID3 799–821

    Google Scholar 

  15. J. Henslin (1996) Social Problems Prentice Hall Upper Saddle River, NJ

    Google Scholar 

  16. L. Hubbard (1999) ArticleTitleCollege aspirations among low-income African American high school students: gendered strategies for success Anthropology & Education Quarterly 30 IssueID3 368–383

    Google Scholar 

  17. Hispanic Association of Corporate Responsibility. (2000). Demographic information. Retrieved on September 7, 2000. http://www.hacr.org/demographics

  18. G. Kao (2000) ArticleTitleGroup images and possible selves among adolescents: linking stereotypes to expectations by race and ethnicity Sociological Forum 15 407–430 Occurrence Handle10.1023/A:1007572209544

    Article  Google Scholar 

  19. G. Kao J. S. Thompson (2003) Racial and ethnic stratification in educational achievement and attainment K. S. Cook J. Hagan (Eds) Annual Review of Sociology NumberInSeriesVol. 29, Karen Annual Review Publishers Palo Alto, CA 417–442

    Google Scholar 

  20. R. Kaufman (1996) ArticleTitlecomparing effects in dichotomous logistic regression: a variety of standardized coefficients Social Science Quarterly 77 90–109

    Google Scholar 

  21. G. Keller (1991) Introduction: advances in assessment and the potential for increasing the number of Hispanics in higher education G. Keller J. Deneen R. Magellan (Eds) Assessment and Access: Hispanics in Higher Education State University of New York Press Albany 1–35

    Google Scholar 

  22. P. W. Kingston R. Hubbard B. Lapp P. Schroeder J. Wilson (2003) ArticleTitleWhy Education Matters Sociology of Education 76 53–70

    Google Scholar 

  23. H. Mehan (1992) ArticleTitleUnderstanding inequality in schools: the contribution of interpretive studies Sociology of Education 65 1–20

    Google Scholar 

  24. K. J. Meier J. Stewart SuffixJr. (1991) The Politics of Hispanic Education Un Paso Pa’lante Y Dos Pa’tras State University of New York Press Albany

    Google Scholar 

  25. S. P. Morgan J. D. Teachman (1988) ArticleTitleLogistic regression: description, examples, and comparisons The Journal of Marriage and the Family 50 929–936

    Google Scholar 

  26. S. Oboler (1998) Hispanics? That’s what they call us R. Delgado J. Stefancic (Eds) The Latino Condition: a Critical Reader NYU Press New York 3–5

    Google Scholar 

  27. M. Olivas (1986) Research on Latino college students: a theoretical framework and inquiry M. Olivas (Eds) Latino College Students Teachers College Press New York 1–25

    Google Scholar 

  28. T. Pascarella Ernest P. T. Terenzini (1991) How College Affects Students Jossey-Bass San Francisco

    Google Scholar 

  29. C. Riordan (1997) Equality and Achievement: an Introduction to the Sociology of Education Longman New York

    Google Scholar 

  30. V. J. Roscigno M. B. Vélez J. W. Ainsworth-Darnell (2001) ArticleTitleLanguage minority achievement, family inequality, and the impact of bilingual education Race and Society 4 69–88 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S1090-9524(02)00035-9

    Article  Google Scholar 

  31. J. D. Teachman (1987) ArticleTitleFamily background, educational resources, and educational attainment American Sociological Review 52 IssueID4 548–557

    Google Scholar 

  32. InstitutionalAuthorNameUS Census Bureau (2003) Statistical Abstract of the United States EditionNumber123 Library of Congress Washington

    Google Scholar 

  33. T. P. Vartanian P. M. Gleason (1999) ArticleTitleDo neighborhood conditions affect high school dropout and college graduation rates The Journal of Socio-Economics 28 IssueID1 21–28 Occurrence Handle10.1016/S1053-5357(99)00011-6

    Article  Google Scholar 

  34. R. Verdugo (1986) Educational Stratification and Hispanics M. Olivas (Eds) Latino College Students Teachers College Press New York 325–347

    Google Scholar 

  35. M. B. Walpole (2003) ArticleTitleSocioeconomic status and college: how ses affects college experiences and outcomes The Review of Higher Education 27 IssueID1 45–73

    Google Scholar 

  36. K. L. Wilson A. Portes (1975) ArticleTitleThe Educational Attainment Process: Results from a National Sample American Journal of Sociology 81 IssueID2 343–363 Occurrence Handle10.1086/226077

    Article  Google Scholar 

  37. A. Wojtkiewicz Roger M. D. Katharine (1995) ArticleTitleHispanic educational attainment: the effect of family background and nativity Social Forces 74 IssueID2 559–574

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Lisette M. Garcia.

Additional information

We are indebted to Robert Kaufman for consultation on methodological and statistical approaches; and to Michael Hughes, James Michaels, and Ellen Plummer for helpful suggestions for revision on earlier versions of this paper. This paper is based in part on a Master’s thesis by the first-named author.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Garcia, L., Bayer, A. Variations Between Latino Groups in us Post-Secondary Educational Attainment*. Res High Educ 46, 511–533 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11162-005-3363-5

Download citation

Keywords

  • Latino
  • Hispanic
  • Cuban
  • Puerto Rican
  • Mexican American
  • educational attainment
  • college completion
  • high school and beyond data
  • logit analysis
  • human capital theory
  • structural discrimination theory