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International Review of Education

, Volume 57, Issue 5–6, pp 529–539 | Cite as

Quality multilingual and multicultural education for lifelong learning

  • Hassana Alidou
  • Christine GlanzEmail author
  • Norbert Nikièma
Article

The World Conferences on Education which took place in Jomtien in 1990 and Dakar in 2000 have contributed significantly to the mobilisation of the attention of policy-makers, the international community and civil society organisations with regard to the need of ensuring that the right to education for all people – particularly language and cultural minorities – is upheld both in developing and developed countries. This special issue of the International Review of Education (IRE) focuses on quality multilingual education as a political and technical response to the educational requirements of learners. Multilingual and multicultural competencies are viewed as a communicative proficiency which is necessary for people to fully function in the 21st century.

The International Commission on Education for the Twenty-first Century, mandated by UNESCO in 1993, spelled out four foundational pillars of education, namely Learning to know, learning to do, learning to live together and learning to...

Keywords

Social Cohesion Language Policy Minority Language Multicultural Education Language Education Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hassana Alidou
    • 1
  • Christine Glanz
    • 2
    Email author
  • Norbert Nikièma
    • 3
  1. 1.Regional Office of UNESCO in Dakar (BRU/DAKAR)DakarSenegal
  2. 2.UNESCO Institute for Lifelong LearningHamburgGermany
  3. 3.University of Ouagadougou, UFR/LACOuagadougou 09Burkina Faso

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