Res Publica

, Volume 20, Issue 4, pp 327–343 | Cite as

Can Culture Justify Infant Circumcision?

Winner of the PG Essay Prize

Abstract

The paper addresses arguments in the recent philosophical and bioethical literature claiming that social and cultural benefits can justify non-therapeutic male infant circumcision. It rejects these claims by referring to the open future argument, according to which infant circumcision is morally unjustifiable because it violates the child’s right to an open future. The paper also addresses an important objection to the open future argument and examines the strength of the objection to refute the application of the argument to the circumcision case.

Keywords

Infant circumcision Ethics Culture Religion Rights Interests Future 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Central European UniversityBudapestHungary

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