Res Publica

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 431–439 | Cite as

Shame and Philosophy

Michael L. Morgan (2008), On Shame. London: Routledge (Thinking In Action) Philip Hutchinson (2008), Shame and Philosophy: An Investigation in the Philosophy of Emotions and Ethics. London: Palgrave Macmillan
Article

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Philosophy and TheologyThe University of Notre Dame AustraliaFremantleAustralia

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