Three Types of Self-Respect

Abstract

According to John Rawls, self-respect is the most important of the primary goods and is essential for the construction of the just society. Self-respect, however, remains a concept which is inadequately theorised, being closely linked to other concepts such as dignity, shame, pride, autonomy and security. Most usually self-respect is considered to be just the self-reflection of the respect we receive from others. In this paper I argue that self-respect consists of both a self-evaluative and a social reflexive element. Using Darwall’s distinction between two types of respect as a building block, I argue that it is worth considering self-respect as having three dimensions. Broadly these are human recognition, status recognition and appraisal.

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Correspondence to David Middleton.

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Middleton, D. Three Types of Self-Respect. Res Publica 12, 59–76 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11158-006-0006-4

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Keywords

  • Darwall
  • dignity
  • justice
  • pride
  • respect
  • self-respect
  • shame