Skip to main content

IJPR: beyond the limit and limiting the beyond

Abstract

It is now almost 20 years since Janicaud’s critique of the ‘theological turn in French phenomenology’ (Janicaud 1991, 2000), with its emphasis on phenomenology and theology as two and never one. Yet since that time there been an explosion of phenomenologies which are, if not overtly, implicitly religious and phenomenology. Thus, we have phenomenologies of prayer, or love, or hope, and the possibilities of further phenomenologies. The challenge of these emerging phenomenologies is that there seems to be no noematic correlate to a noesis in intentionality. To the fore in the reconsideration of this phenomenological challenge is Jean-Luc Marion (although there are others such as Levinas, Jean-Louis Chrétien, and Michel Henry): all aspects of lived experience appear now to belong to the proper scope of phenomenology. Marion considers the relation in Husserl between intentions and intuitions which fulfil these intentions, and suggests a reversal. In Marion, although intentionality is not rejected, the phenomenological flow which the reduction brings to light is from the object as such as it gives itself in intuition, and then from intuition to intention. For Marion, phenomena are saturated—they give too much. Religion becomes a test-case for all phenomenology. This bearing, drawing mainly on The Visible and the Revealed, offers some of the key things in Marion’s phenomenology.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Althaus-Reid M. (2000) Indecent theology: Theological perversions in sex, gender, and politics. Routledge, London

    Book  Google Scholar 

  2. Benson B. E., Wirzba N. (2005) The phenomenology of prayer. Fordham Univesity Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  3. Benson B. E., Wirzba N. (2010) Words of life: New theological turns in French phenomenology. Fordham University Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  4. Blanchot M. (1982) Space of literature. University of Nebraska Press, London

    Google Scholar 

  5. Chrétien J.-L. (2002) The unforgettable and the unhoped for. Fordham University Press, Fordham

    Google Scholar 

  6. De Vries H. (2005) Minimal theologies: Critiques of secular reason in Adorno and Levinas. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore

    Google Scholar 

  7. Derrida J. (1973) Speech and phenomena, and other essays in Husserl’s phenomenology. Northwestern University Press, Chicago

    Google Scholar 

  8. Gerwitz A. (1941) The Cartesian circle. The Philosophical Review 50(4): 368–395

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Hart, K. (eds) (2007) Counter-experiences: Reading Jean-Luc Marion. University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame

    Google Scholar 

  10. Heidegger M. (1978) Being and time. Blackwell, Oxford

    Google Scholar 

  11. Hopkins G. M. (2009) ‘God’s Grandeur (1918)’, Gerard Manley Hopkins: The major works. Oxford University Press, Oxford

    Google Scholar 

  12. Husserl E. (1970) The crisis of European science and transcendental phenomenology: An introduction to phenomenological philosophy. Northwestern University Press, Evanston

    Google Scholar 

  13. Husserl, E. (1983). Ideas pertaining to a pure phenomenology and to a phenomenological philosophy (Vol. 1, §§84–99, §124, §§128–133). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  14. Janicaud D. (1991) Le tournant théologique de la phenomenology française. Editions de l’Eclat, Paris

    Google Scholar 

  15. Janicaud D. (1998) La phenomenology eclatée. Editions de l’Eclat, Paris

    Google Scholar 

  16. Janicaud D. (2000) The theological turn in French phenomenology. Fordham University Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  17. Janicaud D. (2005) Phenomenology “wide open”. Fordham University Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  18. Kant I. (1982) Critique of pure reason. MacMillan Press, London

    Google Scholar 

  19. Kosky J. L. (2001) Levinas and the philosophy of religion. Indiana University Press, Bloomington

    Google Scholar 

  20. Levinas E. (1978) Existence and existents. M Nijhoff, The Hague

    Google Scholar 

  21. Levinas E. (1979) Totality and infinity. M Nijhoff, The Hague

    Google Scholar 

  22. Levinas E. (1990) Difficult freedom. Athlone Press, London

    Google Scholar 

  23. Levinas E. (2000) God, death, and time. Stanford University Press, Stanford

    Google Scholar 

  24. Levinas E. (2001) Is it righteous to be? Interviews with Emmanuel Levinas. Stanford University Press, Stanford

    Google Scholar 

  25. Marion J.-L. (2001) The idol and distance. Fordham University Press, Fordham

    Google Scholar 

  26. Marion J.-L. (2005) Le Visible et le Révélé. Editions du Cerf, Paris

    Google Scholar 

  27. Marion J.-L. (2008) The Visible and the revealed. Fordham University Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  28. Nemo P. (1998) Job and the excess of evil. Duquesne University Press, Pittsburgh

    Google Scholar 

  29. Nieman S. (2004) Evil in modern thought: An alternative history of philosophy. Princeton University Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  30. Purcell M. (2003) Justice as an aporia in Levinas? Explorations in contemporary continental philosophy of religion. Rodopi, Amsterdam

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Michael Purcell.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Purcell, M. IJPR: beyond the limit and limiting the beyond. Int J Philos Relig 68, 121–138 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11153-010-9255-4

Download citation

Keywords

  • Phenomenology
  • Religion
  • Theology
  • Jean-Luc Marion
  • Intentionality
  • Donation
  • Saturation