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Writing: importance, development, and instruction

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Abstract

In this article, we examine why writing is important, how it develops, and effective writing practices. We situate the 5 articles in this special issue of Reading and Writing in this literature, providing a context for the contribution of each paper.

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Correspondence to Steve Graham.

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Graham, S., Gillespie, A. & McKeown, D. Writing: importance, development, and instruction. Read Writ 26, 1–15 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11145-012-9395-2

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