Quality of Life Research

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 669–685

Smoking status and health-related quality of life: a longitudinal study in young adults

  • Jing Tian
  • Alison J. Venn
  • Leigh Blizzard
  • George C. Patton
  • Terry Dwyer
  • Seana L. Gall
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11136-015-1112-6

Cite this article as:
Tian, J., Venn, A.J., Blizzard, L. et al. Qual Life Res (2016) 25: 669. doi:10.1007/s11136-015-1112-6

Abstract

Purpose

The possibility that tobacco use affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has attracted interest. However, a lack of prospective evidence weakens the case for a causal relationship. The aim was to examine the longitudinal relationship between change in smoking status and change in HRQoL in young adults.

Methods

We conducted a population-based cohort study with data collected in 2004–2006 (aged 26–36) and 2009–2011 (aged 31–41). Exposure was change in self-reported smoking status during follow-up. Outcomes were changes in physical and mental HRQoL measured by SF-12.

Results

For physical HRQoL (n = 2080), quitters had a 2.12 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.73, 3.51) point improvement than continuing smokers, whereas former smokers who resumed smoking had a 2.08 (95 % CI 0.21, 3.94) point reduction than those who maintained cessation. Resumed smokers were 39 % (95 % CI 10, 75 %) more likely to have a clinically significant (>5 point) reduction of physical HRQoL than former smokers who maintained cessation. In contrast, quitters were 43 % (95 % CI 3, 98 %) more likely to have a clinically significant (>5 point) improvement in physical HRQoL than continuing smokers. Change in smoking status was not significantly associated with change in mental HRQoL (n = 1788).

Conclusions

Smoking by young adults was cross-sectionally associated with lower physical HRQoL and longitudinally associated with reductions in physical HRQoL. The expectation of short- to medium-term gains in physical HRQoL as well as long-term health benefits may help motivate young adult smokers to quit.

Keywords

Smoking Smoking cessation Quality of life Mental health Longitudinal studies 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Heart Foundation of Australia (AU)
  • GOOH0578
  • PH11H6047
National Health and Medical Research Council (AU)
  • 211316
  • 544923
  • APP1008299
Tasmanian Community Fund
  • D0013808

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Tian
    • 1
  • Alison J. Venn
    • 1
  • Leigh Blizzard
    • 1
  • George C. Patton
    • 2
  • Terry Dwyer
    • 1
    • 3
  • Seana L. Gall
    • 1
  1. 1.Menzies Institute for Medical ResearchUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia
  2. 2.Murdoch Childrens Research InstituteMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.The George Institute for Global HealthUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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