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Family sense of coherence and quality of life

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between family sense of coherence, social support, stress, quality of life and depressive symptoms among Chinese pregnant women.

Methods

A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 267 Chinese pregnant women was recruited at the antenatal clinic and completed the Family Sense of Coherence Scale, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Medical Outcome Study Short Form 12-Item Health Survey and General Health Questionnaire. Path analysis was employed.

Results

Family sense of coherence and social support had a direct impact on the mental health component of quality of life and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Family sense of coherence also mediated the effect of stress on quality of life and depressive symptoms.

Conclusions

The study provides evidence that family sense of coherence and social support play a significant role in promoting quality of life and reducing depressive symptoms during the transition to motherhood. Culturally competent healthcare should be developed to strengthen women’s family sense of coherence and foster social support to combat the stress of new motherhood, thereby promoting quality of life during that period of their lives.

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Acknowledgments

We would like express our sincere thanks to all mothers participated in the study.

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Correspondence to Fei-Wan Ngai.

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Ngai, FW., Ngu, SF. Family sense of coherence and quality of life. Qual Life Res 22, 2031–2039 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-012-0336-y

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Keywords

  • Chinese pregnant women
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Family sense of coherence
  • Quality of life
  • Social support