Quality of Life Research

, Volume 15, Issue 5, pp 925–932 | Cite as

A Survey of Quality of Life and Depression for Police Officers in Kaohsiung, Taiwan

  • Hsiu-Chao Chen
  • Frank Huang-Chih Chou
  • Ming-Chao Chen
  • Shu-Fang Su
  • Shing-Yaw Wang
  • Wen-Wei Feng
  • Pei-Chun Chen
  • Juin-Yang Lai
  • Shin-Shin Chao
  • Shiow-Lan Yang
  • Tung-Chieh Tsai
  • Kuan-Yi Tsai
  • Kung-Shih Lin
  • Chun-Ying Lee
  • Hung-Chi Wu
Article

Abstract

Objective: The enormous job stress of police work may result in depression, which is highly correlated with work disability and poor quality of life. We investigated the quality of life, the probability of depression, and the related risk factors for police officers in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Methods: We used the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) and the Disaster-Related Psychological Screening Test (DRPST) to assess the quality of life and prevalence of depression for 832 police officers in Kaohsiung. Results: The estimated rate of probable major depression was 21.6% (180/832). Those with an educational level of university or above and nondepressed police officers had higher scores in every subscale for quality of life. Police officers older than 50 had higher scores in the mental aspects of quality of life. Family problems and job stress related to achievement, peer pressure about performance, and heavy workloads were predictive factors for depression. Conclusion: Police officers might have a higher estimated rate of depression than previously thought, and those with depression have a poorer quality of life.

Keywords

12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) Depression Disaster-Related Psychological Screening Test (DRPST) Police officers Quality of life 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hsiu-Chao Chen
    • 1
  • Frank Huang-Chih Chou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ming-Chao Chen
    • 1
  • Shu-Fang Su
    • 3
  • Shing-Yaw Wang
    • 2
  • Wen-Wei Feng
    • 4
  • Pei-Chun Chen
    • 1
  • Juin-Yang Lai
    • 1
  • Shin-Shin Chao
    • 1
  • Shiow-Lan Yang
    • 3
  • Tung-Chieh Tsai
    • 1
  • Kuan-Yi Tsai
    • 1
  • Kung-Shih Lin
    • 1
  • Chun-Ying Lee
    • 1
  • Hung-Chi Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Community PsychiatryKai-Suan Psychiatric HospitalKaohsiungTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of NursingI-Shou UniversityTaiwan
  3. 3.Department of NursingKai-Suan Psychiatric HospitalKaohsiungTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of DermatologyE-Da Hospital/I-Shou UniversityKaohsiungTaiwan

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