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Quality & Quantity

, Volume 51, Issue 5, pp 2319–2335 | Cite as

Confirmation bias: methodological causes and a palliative response

  • Adam FfordeEmail author
Article

Abstract

The paper advocates for changes to normative aspects of belief management in applied research. The central push is to argue for methodologically-required choice to include the possibility of adopting the view that a given dataset contains insufficient regularities for predictive theorising. This is argued to be related to how we should understand differences between predictive and non-predictive knowledges, contrasting Crombie and Nisbet. The proposed direction may also support management practices under conditions of uncertainty.

Keywords

Confirmation bias Research methodology Agnotology Unknowability 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Victoria UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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