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How Do they Know? Practicing Knowledge in Comparative Perspective

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Acknowledgments

We want to thank Andrew Deener, Owen Whooley and Gabi Abend for their fruitful suggestions and pointed criticisms on previous drafts of this article, and Javier Auyero for allowing us the opportunity to edit this issue. The usual disclaimers apply.

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Correspondence to Monika Krause.

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Benzecry, C.E., Krause, M. How Do they Know? Practicing Knowledge in Comparative Perspective. Qual Sociol 33, 415–422 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11133-010-9159-8

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Keywords

  • Board Game
  • Empirical Setting
  • Knowledge Practice
  • Diverse Topic
  • Practical Character