Michael J. Glennon: National Security and Double Government

Oxford University Press, New York, 2015, ix + 257 pages, $29.95 (cloth)

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Correspondence to Christopher J. Coyne.

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Coyne, C.J. Michael J. Glennon: National Security and Double Government. Public Choice 163, 393–396 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11127-015-0251-1

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