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New competencies in democratic communication? Blogs, agenda setting and political participation

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Abstract

Contrary to initial predictions Internet-mediated forms of communication have not become mediums of mass communication. Traditional media still reach far more people than even the most popular websites. Still, there is evidence that blogs in particular help mobilize opinions, and set the agenda for political elites such as journalists and politicians, while providing interested citizens with a new technology of knowledge as well as a surprisingly effective way to participate in politics. This study focuses on how the presence of blogs has altered the structure of political communication.

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Correspondence to Deva Woodly.

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Woodly, D. New competencies in democratic communication? Blogs, agenda setting and political participation. Public Choice 134, 109–123 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11127-007-9204-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11127-007-9204-7

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