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Does Gender Influence Outcome in Schizophrenia?

Abstract

Good outcome of schizophrenia has several meanings and most of these meanings carry both positive and negative undertones depending on perspective. Currently, a person’s subjective sense that illness has been partly overcome and that life is meaningful has come to be viewed as the most valid signpost of a good outcome. A review of the literature shows that women have certain advantages over men in that their illness starts at a later age and that their symptoms respond more quickly and more completely to available treatments. These advantages serve women well at the outset of illness but benefits appear to dissipate over time. Gender differences in outcome thus vary depending on the age of the patient. They also vary with the social and cultural background of the study population. Neither sex, therefore, has a monopoly on good outcome. The hope is that studying gender differences will uncover critical elements of good outcome that lead to interventions that will benefit both women and men.

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Seeman, M.V. Does Gender Influence Outcome in Schizophrenia?. Psychiatr Q 90, 173–184 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11126-018-9619-y

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Keywords

  • Schizophrenia
  • Outcome
  • Gender
  • Recovery
  • Response
  • Side effects