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PROSPECTS

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 289–309 | Cite as

The elusiveness of teacher quality: A comparative analysis of teacher certification and student achievement in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

  • Alexander W. WisemanEmail author
  • Fawziah Al-bakr
Open File

Abstract

In national education systems worldwide, teacher quality has become synonymous with education reform efforts, but a more elusive goal is empirically measuring teacher quality. One proposed measure of teacher quality, teacher licensing, also known as certification, is an increasingly ubiquitous component of national education systems and pre-service teacher education around the world. Rapidly developing national education systems, like those in the Arabian Gulf states, are actively seeking to measure teacher quality through teacher certification and to estimate teacher quality using scores on student achievement tests. This study synthesizes research literature and contextual data as a foundation for using hierarchical linear models to estimate the impact of teacher certification on student achievement in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. Despite the emphasis on improving teacher quality by establishing teacher certification requirements in GCC national education systems, the researchers found neither a direct nor a consistent association between teacher certification and student achievement in the GCC.

Keywords

Teacher quality Certification Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Student achievement Professional standards Teacher education Arabian Gulf 

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Copyright information

© UNESCO IBE 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Comparative and International Education Program, College of EducationLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA
  2. 2.King Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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