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PROSPECTS

, 41:249 | Cite as

Financing education for children affected by conflict: Lessons from Save the Children’s Rewrite the Future campaign

  • Janice DolanEmail author
  • Susy Ndaruhutse
Open File

Abstract

In recent years, Save the Children, a non-governmental organization, prioritized education for children affected by conflict through its Rewrite the Future Campaign. By significantly scaling up the resources allocated to programmes in conflict-affected countries, the organization has grown its education programmes in these contexts. Thus it has enabled 1.3 million more children to have access to education and improved the quality of education for more than 10 million. The campaign also had an international impact by analysing and advocating for increases in aid flows to conflict-affected countries. This has made the international community more aware of the need for access to education for children affected by conflict and more willing to ensure it. The article highlights the achievements of Save the Children UK, and the challenges it faces, by looking at funding volumes and sources of funding for country programme activities, along with its international influence on the global funding for countries affected by conflict.

Keywords

Conflict Emergencies Education Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) Aid Save the Children Rewrite the Future campaign 

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Copyright information

© UNESCO IBE 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CfBT Education TrustReadingUK

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