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PROSPECTS

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 191–204 | Cite as

The influence of education on violent conflict and peace: Inequality, opportunity and the management of diversity

  • Graham K. BrownEmail author
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Abstract

This article examines the ways in which education and educational policy impact upon the likelihood and dynamics of violent conflict. It argues that education is rarely directly implicated in the incidence of violent conflict but identifies three main mechanisms through which education can indirectly accentuate or mitigate the risk of conflict: through the creation and maintenance of socio-economic divisions, including horizontal inequalities between ethnic groups; through processes of political inclusion and exclusion; and through accommodation of cultural diversity. It further suggests that designing conflict-sensitive education systems is particularly problematic because the implications of these three principal mechanisms often pull in different directions.

Keywords

Education policy Violent conflicts Decentralization Inequality Cultural diversity 

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Copyright information

© UNESCO IBE 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Development StudiesUniversity of BathBathUK

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