Prevention Science

, Volume 17, Issue 8, pp 1044–1053

Bullying Prevention: a Summary of the Report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention
  • Daniel J. Flannery
  • Jonathan Todres
  • Catherine P. Bradshaw
  • Angela Frederick Amar
  • Sandra Graham
  • Mark Hatzenbuehler
  • Matthew Masiello
  • Megan Moreno
  • Regina Sullivan
  • Tracy Vaillancourt
  • Suzanne M. Le Menestrel
  • Frederick Rivara
Commentary

Abstract

Long tolerated as a rite of passage into adulthood, bullying is now recognized as a major and preventable public health problem. The consequences of bullying—for those who are bullied, the perpetrators of bullying, and the witnesses—include poor physical health, anxiety, depression, increased risk for suicide, poor school performance, and future delinquent and aggressive behavior. Despite ongoing efforts to address bullying at the law, policy, and programmatic levels, there is still much to learn about the consequences of bullying and the effectiveness of various responses. In 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine published a report entitled Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy and Practice, which examined the evidence on bullying, its impact, and responses to date. This article summarizes the report’s key findings and recommendations related to bullying prevention.

Keywords

Prevention Bullying Peer victimization 

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Copyright information

© Society for Prevention Research 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Flannery
    • 1
  • Jonathan Todres
    • 2
  • Catherine P. Bradshaw
    • 3
  • Angela Frederick Amar
    • 4
  • Sandra Graham
    • 5
  • Mark Hatzenbuehler
    • 6
  • Matthew Masiello
    • 7
  • Megan Moreno
    • 8
  • Regina Sullivan
    • 9
  • Tracy Vaillancourt
    • 10
  • Suzanne M. Le Menestrel
    • 11
  • Frederick Rivara
    • 8
  1. 1.Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social SciencesCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Georgia State University College of LawAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Curry School of EducationUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  4. 4.Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of NursingEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  5. 5.Graduate School of Education & Information StudiesUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  6. 6.Socio-medical Sciences; Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.The Children’s Institute of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  8. 8.University of Washington and Seattle Children’s HospitalSeattleUSA
  9. 9.New York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  10. 10.Children’s Mental Health and Violence PreventionUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada
  11. 11.Board on Children, Youth and FamiliesThe National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and MedicineWashingtonUSA

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