Can Parent Training Alter Parent Practice and Reduce Conduct Problems in Ethnic Minority Children? A Randomized Controlled Trial

Abstract

A randomized prevention study for ethnic minority mothers assessed the intervention effects of Parent Management Training—Oregon Model (PMTO) on maternal parent practices and child behavior. Ninety-six mothers from Somalia and Pakistan and their children aged 3 to 9 years were randomized to PMTO or a wait-list condition (WLC). Assessments were carried out at the baseline and post-intervention, using standardized measures and a multi-agent approach. All analyses were based on the intention-to-treat principle. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that PMTO was effective in enhancing parent practices, with a decrease in harsh discipline and an increase in positive parenting. Moreover, PMTO produced reductions in motherreported child conduct problems. The largest effect sizes were found among mothers who attended more than 50 % of the PMTO group sessions. Teacher reports showed, however, that there were no significant intervention effects on conduct problems and social competence in kindergarten or school. The results emphasize the importance and feasibility of offering PMTO to ethnic minority families.

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Acknowledgements

We are grateful to the following people who participated in extensive work related to the study: Monica Flock, Ragnhild Pettersen, Begoña Gomez, Sissel Torsvik, Mona Kristin Bratli, Oddbjørg Holten, Elisabeth Askeland, Terje Ogden and Reidar Jakobsen. Our special thanks go to the families, agencies, and interventionists for their contribution to this study.

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Correspondence to Ragnhild Bjørknes.

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Bjørknes, R., Manger, T. Can Parent Training Alter Parent Practice and Reduce Conduct Problems in Ethnic Minority Children? A Randomized Controlled Trial. Prev Sci 14, 52–63 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11121-012-0299-9

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Keywords

  • RCT
  • PMTO
  • Ethnic minority children
  • Preventing conduct problems