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Prevention Science

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 206–217 | Cite as

The Strong African American Families–Teen Trial: Rationale, Design, Engagement Processes, and Family-Specific Effects

  • Steven M. Kogan
  • Gene H. Brody
  • Virginia K. Molgaard
  • Christina M. Grange
  • Desirée A. H. Oliver
  • Tracy N. Anderson
  • Ralph J. DiClemente
  • Gina M. Wingood
  • Yi-fu Chen
  • Megan C. Sperr
Article

Abstract

This study addresses two limitations in the literature on family-centered intervention programs for adolescents: ruling out nonspecific factors that may explain program effects and engaging parents into prevention programs. The Rural African American Families Health project is a randomized, attention-controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of the Strong African American Families–Teen (SAAF–T) program, a family-centered risk-reduction intervention for rural African American adolescents. Rural African American families (n = 502) with a 10th-grade student were assigned randomly to receive SAAF–T or a similarly structured, family-centered program that focused on health and nutrition. Families participated in audio computer-assisted self-interviews at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Program implementation procedures yielded a design with equivalent doses, five sessions of family-centered intervention programming for families in each condition. Of eligible families screened for participation, 76% attended four or five sessions of the program. Consistent with our primary hypotheses, SAAF–T youth, compared to attention-control youth, demonstrated higher levels of protective family management skills, a finding that cannot be attributed to nonspecific factors such as aggregating families in a structured, interactive setting.

Keywords

Attention control Family-centered intervention Program trial 

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Copyright information

© Society for Prevention Research 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven M. Kogan
    • 1
  • Gene H. Brody
    • 1
  • Virginia K. Molgaard
    • 2
  • Christina M. Grange
    • 1
  • Desirée A. H. Oliver
    • 1
  • Tracy N. Anderson
    • 1
  • Ralph J. DiClemente
    • 3
  • Gina M. Wingood
    • 3
  • Yi-fu Chen
    • 1
  • Megan C. Sperr
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Iowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  3. 3.Emory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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