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Reconstruction of the absorption spectrum of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 optical mutants from the in vivo signature of individual pigments

Abstract

In this work, we reconstructed the absorption spectrum of different Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 optical strains by summing the computed signature of all pigments present in this organism. To do so, modifications to in vitro pigment spectra were first required: namely wavelength shift, curve smoothing, and the package effect calculation derived from high pigment densities were applied. As a result, we outlined a plausible shape for the in vivo absorption spectrum of each chromophore. These are flatter and slightly broader in physiological conditions yet the mean weight-specific absorption coefficient remains identical to the in vitro conditions. Moreover, we give an estimate of all pigment concentrations without applying spectrophotometric correlations, which are often prone to error. The computed cell spectrum reproduces in an accurate manner the experimental spectrum for all the studied wavelengths in the wild-type, Olive, and PAL strain. The gathered pigment concentrations are in agreement with reported values in literature. Moreover, different illumination set-ups were evaluated to calculate the mean absorption cross-section of each chromophore. Finally, a qualitative estimate of light-limited cellular growth at each wavelength is given. This investigation describes a novel way to approach the cell absorption spectrum and shows all its inherent potential for photosynthesis research.

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Acknowledgements

We kindly acknowledge Alberto Conejero for his suggestions on the modeling part.

Funding

DF was supported by an internal grant of Palacký University Olomouc (no. IGA_PrF_2020_028) and DL by the ERDF project “Plants as a tool for sustainable global development” (no. CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16–019/0000827)."

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DF and JFU conceived the research; DF and JVO-V performed the simulations; DF, DL, and JFU analyzed the data; DF did the experiments, wrote the manuscript with contributions from DL, JVO-V, and JFU, and agreed to serve as the author responsible for contact and ensured communication.

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Correspondence to David Fuente.

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Fuente, D., Lazar, D., Oliver-Villanueva, J.V. et al. Reconstruction of the absorption spectrum of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 optical mutants from the in vivo signature of individual pigments. Photosynth Res 147, 75–90 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11120-020-00799-8

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Keywords

  • Absorption
  • Spectrum
  • Light
  • Pigment
  • Modeling
  • Synechocystis
  • Photosystem