Population and Environment

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 107–131 | Cite as

Completing the Picture: The Challenges of Bringing “Consumption” into the Population–Environment Equation

  • Sara R. Curran
  • Alex de Sherbinin

Abstract

The issue of environmentally significant consumption is closely linked to population–environment relationships, but with some exceptions the two literatures have proceeded along separate tracks. We explore three consumption–environment research agendas: household–level consumption; ecological footprints and material flow accounting; and values, attitudes, behaviors and lifestyles. In each of these we note areas of overlap with the population–environment literature, and ways in which the population–environment literature might benefit or borrow from conceptual or methodological approaches in the consumption–environment literature. We also propose ways in which consumption research might be integrated into the largest (in terms of funding) of the population–environment research agendas, land-use and land-cover change research. In the concluding section we present a conceptual framework for understanding the population–environment literature that incorporates production and consumption into the model, and we propose some population–consumption–environment (PCE) research areas to which the population-environment research community could make significant contributions.

Keywords

environmentally significant consumption demography and the environment 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Batista, S., Silva, E., Galhardo, S., Viviana, P., Cerejeira, M. J 2002Evaluation of pesticide contamination of ground water in two agricultural areas of portugalInternational Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry82601608Google Scholar
  2. Best Foot Forward. Website (2000). Available at (http://www.bestfootforward.com/).Google Scholar
  3. Bin, S., Dowlatabadi, H. 2005Consumer lifestyle approach to US energy use and the related CO2 emissionsEnergy Policy33197208Google Scholar
  4. Bloomfield, J., Pearson, H.L 2000Land use, land use change, forestry and agricultural activities in the clean development mechanism: Estimates of greenhouse gas offset potentialMitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change5924Google Scholar
  5. Brown, L., Flavin, C., Kane, H 1992Vital SignsWorldwatch InstituteWashington, D.C.Google Scholar
  6. Brown, S., Sathaye, J., Cannell, M., Kauppi, P., Hueveldop, J., Weyers, S., & Singh, N. (1995). Management of Forests for Mitigation of Climate Change. Working Group II, IPCC 1995 Asssessment, Chapter IIGoogle Scholar
  7. Busch, B., Sathaye, J.A., & Sanchez, A. (2000). Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory – Report No. 42289Google Scholar
  8. Canadell, J. (2000). Land use change and the terrestrial carbon cycle in Asia (APN2000-2). http://www.gcte.orgGoogle Scholar
  9. Carlsson-Kanyama, A., Lindén, A. L 1999Travel patterns and environmental effects now aind in the future: Implications of difference in energy consumption among socio- economic groupsEcological Economics30405417Google Scholar
  10. Chambers, N., Lewis, K 2001Ecological Footprint Analysis Towards Sustainable Indicators for BusinessBest Foot ForwardOxfordGoogle Scholar
  11. Chu, C. Y. C., & Yu., R.-R. (2002). Population dynamics and the decline in biodiversity: A survey of the literature. In: W. Lutz, A. Prskawetz, & W. C. Sanderson (Eds.), Population and Environment: Methods of Analysis. Special Supplement to the Population and Development Review, 28, 126–143Google Scholar
  12. Ciu, Y. J., Hens, L., Zhu, Y. G., Zhao, J. Z 2004Ecological footprint of Shandong ChinaJournal of Environmental Science16167172Google Scholar
  13. Deutsch, L., Jansson, A., Troell, M., Ronnback, P., Folke, C., Kautsky, N 2000The ecological footprint: Communicating human dependence on nature’s workEcological Economics32351355Google Scholar
  14. Dietz, T., & Rosa, E. (1997). Environmental impacts of population and consumption In P. C. Stern, T. Dietz, V. W. Ruttan, R. H. Socolow & J. L. Sweeney (Eds.), Environmentally Significant Consumption: Research Directions, Washington, DC: National Academy Press. (Available at http://books.nap.edu/books/0309055989/html/index.html)Google Scholar
  15. Duchin, F. (2003). Household Lifestyles: Ideas for a Research Program. Paper presented at the PERN Workshop on Population, Consumption and the Environment, 19 October 2003, Montreal, Canada. (Available at http://www.populationenvironmentresearch.org/workshops.jsp)Google Scholar
  16. Duchin, F. (1997). Structural economics: A Strategy for analyzing the implications of consumption. In P.C. Stern, T. Dietz, V. W. Ruttan, R. H. Socolow & J. L. Sweeney (Eds.). Environmentally Significant Consumption: Research Directions, Washington, DC: National Academy Press. (Available athttp://books.nap.edu/books/0309055989/html/index.html)Google Scholar
  17. Durning, A. 1992How Much is Enough?Worldwatch Institute/WW NortonWashington, DCGoogle Scholar
  18. Ehrlich, P., Holdren, J 1971Impact of population growthScience17112121217Google Scholar
  19. Entwisle, B. (2003). Household dynamics, discussion prepared for the PERN Workshop on population, consumption and the environment, 19 October 2003, Montreal, Canada. (Available at http://www.populationenvironmentresearch.org/workshops.jsp)Google Scholar
  20. Entwisle, B. (2001). Population and land use in Nang Rong, Thailand. Paper presented at the Annual Meetings of the Population Association of America, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  21. Eurostat. (2001). Economy-wide Material Flow Accounts and Derived Indicators: A Methodological Guide. Luxembourg: Eurostat, European Commission, Office for Official Publications of the European CommunitiesGoogle Scholar
  22. Evans, T. P. , Kelley, H. 2004Multi-scale analysis of a household level agent-based model of landcover changeJournal of Environmental Management725772Google Scholar
  23. Evans, T. P., & Moran, E. F. (2002). Spatial integration of social and biophysical factors related to landcover change. In L. Wolfgang, A. Prskawetz & W. C. Sanderson (Eds.). (2002), Population and Environment: Methods of Analysis. Special Supplement to the Population and Development Review, 28Google Scholar
  24. Fischer-Kowalski, M. (2004). The increasing spatial rift between consumption and environmental pressures: A challenge for research designs, indicators and analysis. Contribution to the PERN Cyberseminar on Population, Consumption, Environment Dynamics on 19 May 2004. (Available at http://listhost.ciesin.org/lists/public/pernseminars/msg00419.html)Google Scholar
  25. Folke, C. 1988Energy economy of Salmon aquaculture in the Baltic SeaEnvironmental Management12525537Google Scholar
  26. Folke, C., Jansson, A., Larsson, J., Costanza, R 1997Ecosystem appropriation by citiesAmbio26167172Google Scholar
  27. Fox, J.Rindfuss, R. R.Walsh, S. J Mishra, V. eds. 2001People and the Environment: Approaches for Linking Household and Community Surveys to Remote Sensing and GISKluwer Academic PublishersBoston, MAGoogle Scholar
  28. Fuchs, D., & S. Lorek. (2001). An Inquiry into the Impact of Globalization on the Potential for ‘Sustainable Consumption’ in Households. Program for Research and Documentation for a Sustainable Society Report 2/01. (Available at http://www.prosus.uio.no/english)Google Scholar
  29. Grossman, G. M., Krueger, A. B 1995Economic growth and the environment,Quarterly Journal of Economics110353377Google Scholar
  30. Guo, L., Nordmark, C., Spurlock, F., Johnson, B. R., Marshall Lee, L. J., Goh, K.S 2004Characterizing dependence of pesticide load in surface water on precipitation and pesticide use for the sacramento river watershedEnvironmental Science and Technology3838423852Google Scholar
  31. Hall, K., Schreier, H., Berka, C 2001Linking water quality with agricultural intensification in a rural watershedWater, Air and Soil Pollution127389Google Scholar
  32. Heilig, G. K. 1994Neglected dimensions of global land-use change: reflections and dataPopulation and Development Review20831859Google Scholar
  33. Hunt, J. W., Tjeerdema, R., Anderson, B. S., de Vlaming, V., Phillips, B. M., Puckett, H. M 1999Patterns of aquatic toxicity in an agriculturally dominated coastal watershedAgriculture, Ecosystems and the Environment7575Google Scholar
  34. Jansson, A., Folke, C., Rockstrom, J., Gordon, L 1999Linking freshwater flows and ecosystem services appropriated by people: the case of the baltic sea drainage basinEcosystems2351366Google Scholar
  35. Kates, R. 2000Population and consumption: What we know, what we need to knowEnvironment421019Google Scholar
  36. Langhelle, O. (2001). Sustainable Production and Consumption—from Conceptions of Sustainable Development to Household Strategies for Sustainable Consumption. Program for Research and Documentation for a Sustainable Society Report 4/01. (Available at http://www.prosus.uio.no/english)Google Scholar
  37. Liu, J., Daily, G. C., Ehrlich, P. R., Luck, G. W 2003Effects of household dynamics on resource consumption and biodiversityNature421530533Google Scholar
  38. Lutz, W. (Ed.). (1994). Population, Development, Environment: Understanding their Interactions in Mauritius. New York: Springer-Verlag and IIASAGoogle Scholar
  39. Lutz, W., Prskawetz, A., & Sanderson, W. C. (2002). Population and Environment: Methods of Analysis. Special Supplement to the Population and Development Review, 28Google Scholar
  40. Lutzenheiser, L. (1997). Social structure, culture, and technology: Modeling the driving forces of household energy consumption. In P. C. Stern, T. Dietz, V. W. Ruttan, R. H. Socolow, & J. L. Sweeney (Eds.), Environmentally significant consumption: Research directions. Washington, DC: National Academy Press (available at http://books.nap.edu/books/0309055989/html/index.html)Google Scholar
  41. MacKellar, F. L., Lutz, W., Prinz, C., Goujon, A 1995Population, Households, and CO2 emissionsPopulation and Development Review21849865Google Scholar
  42. Moffatt, I. 2000Ecological footprints and sustainable developmentEcological Economics32359362Google Scholar
  43. Myers, N. 1997Consumption in relation to population, environment and developmentThe Environmentalist173344Google Scholar
  44. O’Neill, B., MacKellar, F. L., Lutz, W 2001Population and Climate ChangeCambridge University PressNew YorkGoogle Scholar
  45. O’Neill, B. C., & Chen, B. S. (2002). Demographic determinants of household energy use in the United States. In W. Lutz, A. Prskawetz & W. C. Sanderson (Eds.), Population and Environment: Methods of Analysis. Special Supplement to the Population and Development Review, 28, 53–88Google Scholar
  46. Pennington, D. W., Potting, J., Finnveden, G., Lolliet,  O., Rydberg, Ty., Rebitzer, G 2004Life cycle assessment part 2: Current impact assessment practiceEnvironment International30721739Google Scholar
  47. Princen, T. 2001Consumption and its externalities: where economy meets ecologyGlobal Environmental Politics11130Google Scholar
  48. Prskawetz, A., Leiwen, J., O’Neill, B. C. (2004). Demographic composition and projections of car use in Austria. Austrian Demographic YearbookGoogle Scholar
  49. Rapport, D.J. 2000Ecological footprints and ecosystem health: Complementary approaches to a sustainable futureEcological Economics32367370Google Scholar
  50. Rebitzer, G., Ekvall, T., Frischknecth, R., Hunkeler, D., Norris, G., Schmidt, W-P 2004Life cycle assessment: Goal and Scpe definition, inventory analyss, and applicationsEnvironment International30701720Google Scholar
  51. Rees, W.E. 1992Ecologicial Footprints and appropriated carrying capacity: What urban economics leaves outEnvironmental Urbanism4121130Google Scholar
  52. Reusswig, F., Lotze-Campen, H., & Gerlinger, K. (2003). Changing global lifestyle and consumption patterns: The case of energy and food.” Paper presented at the PERN␣Workshop on Population, Consumption and the Environment, 19 October 2003, Montreal, Canada. (Available at http://www.populationenvironmentresearch.org/workshops.jsp)Google Scholar
  53. Rindfuss, R.R., Prasartkul, P., Walsh, S. J., Entwisle, J. B., Sawangdee, Y., Vogler, J. B 2003

    Household-parcel linkages in Nang Rong, Thailand: Challenges of large samples

    Fox, J.Rindfuss, R.R.Walsh, S. J.Mishra, V. eds. People and the Environment: Approaches for Linking Household and Community Surveys to Remote Sensing and GISKluwer Academic PublishersBoston, MA131172
    Google Scholar
  54. Sanne, C. 2002Willing consumers—or locked-in? Policies for a sustainable consumptionEcological Economics42273287Google Scholar
  55. Schipper, L. (1997). Carbon Emissions from Travel in the OECD Countries In P. C. Stern, T. Dietz, V. W. Ruttan, R. H. Socolow & J. L. Sweeney (Eds.), Environmentally Significant Consumption: Research Directions. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. (Available at http://books.nap.edu/books/0309055989/html/index.html)Google Scholar
  56. Small, C., Cohen, J 2003Continental physiography, climate and the global distribution of human populationCurrent Anthropology45269277Google Scholar
  57. Smil, V. (2002). Population and environmental services. In W. Lutz, A. Prskawetz, & W. C. Sanderson (Eds.), Population and Environment: Methods of Analysis. Special Supplement to the Population and Development Review, 28, 187–198Google Scholar
  58. Smil, V. (2003). Energy Consumption and the Environment, Paper presented at the PERN Workshop on Population, Consumption and the Environment, 19 October 2003, Montreal, Canada. (Available at http://www.populationenvironmentresearch.org/workshops.jsp)Google Scholar
  59. Spangenberg, J., Lorek, S 2002Environmentally sustainable household consumption: From aggregate environmental pressures to priority fields of actionEcological Economics43127140Google Scholar
  60. Stern, P., Dietz, T., Ruttan, V., Socolow, R. & Sweeney, J., (Eds.), (1997). Environmentally Significant Consumption: Research Directions. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. (Available at http://books.nap.edu/books/0309055989/html/index.html)Google Scholar
  61. Stern, P. (1997). Toward a working definition of consumption for environmental research and policy. In P. C. Stern, T. Dietz, V. W. Ruttan, R. H. Socolow & J. L. Sweeney (Eds.). Environmentally Significant Consumption: Research Directions. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. (Available at http://books.nap.edu/books/0309055989/html/ index.html)Google Scholar
  62. Sutton, P., Costanza, R 2002Global estimates of market and non-market values derived from nighttime satellite imagery, land cover, and ecosystem service valuationEcological Economics41509527Google Scholar
  63. Thorgerson, J., Olander, F 2002Human values and the emergence of a sustainable consumption pattern: A panel studyJournal of Economic Psychology23605630Google Scholar
  64. Wackernagal, M. , Rees, W. 1996Our ecological footprintNew SocietyBritish Columbia, CAGoogle Scholar
  65. Wackernagel, M., Schulz, N. B., Deumling, D., Linares, A. C., Jenkins, M., Kapos, V., Monfreda, C., Loh, J., Myers, N., Norgaard, R., Randers, J 2002Tracking the ecological overshoot of the human economyProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences9992669271 (Available at http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/142033699v1)Google Scholar
  66. Walsh, S. J., Welsh, W. F., Evans, T. P., Entwisle, B., Rindfuss, R. R 1999Scale dependent relationships between population and environment in Northeastern ThailandPhotogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing6597105Google Scholar
  67. Walsh, S. J.Crews-Meyer, K. A. eds. 2001Linking People, Place and Policy: A GIScience ApproachKluwer Academic PublishersNorwell, MAGoogle Scholar
  68. Wilk, R. 2002Consumption, human needs, and global environmental changeGlobal Environmental Change12513Google Scholar
  69. Wilk, R. 1998Emulation, imitation and global consumerismOrganization and Environment11314333Google Scholar
  70. York, R., Eugene, A. R., Thomas, D. 2003A rift in modernity? Assessing the anthropogenic sources of global climate change with the STIRPAT modelInternational Journal of Sociology and Social Policy233151Google Scholar
  71. Zacarias-Farah, A., Geyer-Allely, E 2003Household consumption patterns in OECD countries: trends and figuresJournal of Cleaner Production11819827Google Scholar
  72. Zeng, Y., Vaupel, J., Wang, Z 1997A multidimensional model for projecting family households – with an illustrative numerical approach”Mathematical Population Studies6187216Google Scholar
  73. Zheng, Y., Vaupel, J., & Wang, Z. (1999). Household projection using conventional demographic data. In W. Lutz, J. Vaupel, & D. Ahlburg (Eds.), Frontiers of Population Forecasting, a supplement to Vol. 24, 1998 of Population and Development ReviewGoogle Scholar
  74. Zhu, X. (2003). Environmental impacts of food production: A comparison of pork and novel protein food chains, IHDP Update, 1/2003 (Available athttp://www.ihdp.org)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara R. Curran
    • 1
  • Alex de Sherbinin
    • 2
  1. 1.Princeton UniversityUSA
  2. 2.CIESIN, Columbia UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations