Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 137–149

Transcriptional and metabolic profiles of stress-induced, embryogenic tobacco microspores

  • Julia Hosp
  • Alisher Tashpulatov
  • Ute Roessner
  • Ekaterina Barsova
  • Heidrun Katholnigg
  • Ralf Steinborn
  • Balázs Melikant
  • Sergey Lukyanov
  • Erwin Heberle-Bors
  • Alisher Touraev
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11103-006-9078-y

Cite this article as:
Hosp, J., Tashpulatov, A., Roessner, U. et al. Plant Mol Biol (2007) 63: 137. doi:10.1007/s11103-006-9078-y

Abstract

Higher plant microspores, when subjected to various stress treatments in vitro, are able to reprogram their regular gametophytic development towards the sporophytic pathway to form haploid embryos and plants. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and metabolic profiling were used to characterize this developmental switch. Following differential reverse Northern hybridizations 90 distinct up-regulated sequences were identified in stressed, embryogenic microspores (accessible at www.univie.ac.at/ntsm). Sequence analyses allowed the classification of these genes into functional clusters such as metabolism, chromosome remodeling, signaling, transcription and translation, while the putative functions of half of the sequences remained unknown. A comparison of metabolic profiles of non-stressed and stressed microspores using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) identified 70 compounds, partly displaying significant changes in metabolite levels, e.g., highly elevated levels of isocitrate and isomaltose in stressed microspores compared to non-stressed microspores. The formation of embryogenic microspores is discussed on the basis of the identified transcriptional and metabolic profiles.

Keywords

Tobacco Microspores Embryogenesis Metabolic profiling Suppression subtractive hybridization Transcripts 

Abbreviations

ROS

Reactive oxygen species

SSH

Suppression subtractive hybridization

GC/MS

Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

TCA

Tricarbonic acid/Acetyl-CoA

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Hosp
    • 1
  • Alisher Tashpulatov
    • 1
  • Ute Roessner
    • 2
  • Ekaterina Barsova
    • 3
  • Heidrun Katholnigg
    • 1
  • Ralf Steinborn
    • 4
  • Balázs Melikant
    • 5
  • Sergey Lukyanov
    • 3
  • Erwin Heberle-Bors
    • 1
  • Alisher Touraev
    • 1
  1. 1.Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University Departments at the Campus Vienna Biocenter, Department of Plant Molecular BiologyVienna UniversityViennaAustria
  2. 2.Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, School of BotanyUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Shemiakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic ChemistryMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Institute of Animal Breeding and GeneticsUniversity of Veterinary MedicineViennaAustria
  5. 5.Intercell AGViennaAustria

Personalised recommendations