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Biological activities associated to the chemodiversity of the brown algae belonging to genus Lobophora (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae)

Abstract

Although Lobophora belongs to a marine algal family (Dictyotaceae) that produces a large array of secondary metabolites, it has received little attention compared to other genera, such as Dictyota, in terms of natural compounds isolation and characterization. However, metabolites produced by Lobophora species have been found to exhibit a wide array of bioactivities including pharmacological (e.g. antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, antitumoral), pesticidal, and ecological. This review aims to report the state-of-the-art of the natural products isolated from Lobophora species (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae) and their associated bioactivities. All bioactivities documented in the literature are reported, therefore including studies for which pure active substances were described, as well as studies limited to extracts or fractions. From the early 1980s until today, 49 scientific works have been published on Lobophora chemistry and bioactivity, among which 40 have reported bioactivities. Only six studies, however, have identified, characterized and tested no less than 23 bioactive pure compounds (three C21 polyunsaturated alcohols, three fatty-acids, a macrolactone, 11 polyketides, a few sulfated polysaccharides, three sulfolipids, a tocopherol derivative). The present review intends to raise awareness of chemists and biologists given the recent significant taxonomic progress of this brown algal genus, which holds a promising plethora of natural products yet to be discovered with ecological and pharmacological properties.

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Fig. 1

Abbreviations

ACVr:

Acyclovir-resistant

EC50 :

Half maximal effective concentration

HCT-116:

Human colon tumor

HEp-2:

Human epithelial type 2

HIV:

Human immunodeficiency virus

HL-60:

Human promyelocytic leukemia cell line

HSV-1/2:

Herpes simplex virus type 1 or 2

HT-29:

Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line

IC50 :

Half maximal inhibitory concentration

LC50 :

Median lethal concentration

LD50 :

Median lethal dose

MCF-7:

Human breast carcinoma cell line

MDCK:

Madin–Darby canine kidney

MIC90 :

Minimal inhibitory concentration to inhibit the growth of 90 % of organisms

MZI:

Mean zone of inhibition

RSV:

Respiratory syncytial virus

SQDG:

Sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol

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Vieira, C., Gaubert, J., De Clerck, O. et al. Biological activities associated to the chemodiversity of the brown algae belonging to genus Lobophora (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae). Phytochem Rev 16, 1–17 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11101-015-9445-x

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Keywords

  • Bioactivity
  • Brown algae
  • Lobophora
  • Natural products