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Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal

, Volume 51, Issue 7, pp 558–563 | Cite as

Synthesis and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of 2-{[5-(2-Chlorophenyl)-4H-1,2,4-Triazol- 3-YL]Sulfanyl}-1-(Substituted Phenyl)Ethanones

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With the aim of obtaining potential anti-inflammatory compounds, 2-{[5-(2-chlorophenyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]sulfanyl}-1-(phenyl)ethanone and a series of its derivatives were synthesized, purified by flash chromatography, and characterised by spectral and elemental analysis. All the new synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced paw edema test on Wistar albino rats. The results suggest that 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-{[5-(2-chlorophenyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]sulfanyl}ethanone 7l exhibit remarkable activity when compared with indomethacin even in the absence of carboxyl group in its structure, which reduces the possibility of gastric irritation.

Keywords

5-(2-chlorophenyl)-4H-[1,2,4]triazole-3-thiol 2-bromo-1-(substituted phenyl)ethanone anti-inflammatory activity 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutical ChemistryInstitute of Pharmaceutical Education and ResearchWardhaIndia

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