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Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal

, Volume 50, Issue 9, pp 603–607 | Cite as

Antioxidant Activity of Medicinal Plants from Southeastern Kazakhstan

  • O. A. Sapko
  • O. V. Chebonenko
  • A. Sh. Utarbaeva
  • A. Zh. Amirkulova
  • A. K. Tursunova
MEDICINAL PLANTS
  • 154 Downloads

The antioxidant activity and total contents of phenolic compounds and flavonoids in extracts of several medicinal plants from southeastern Kazakhstan are studied. Antioxidant activity was evaluated in vitro using the cation-radical 2,2 -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS•+), the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and the FRAP method. The antioxidant and antiradical activities of the studied plants varied over wide ranges. Extracts of roots and the aerial part of Geranium collinum had the greatest antioxidant and antiradical activity; of Agrimonia asiatica, Alchemilla vulgaris, and Alhagi pseudalhagi, high activity. The antioxidant activities of H2O–EtOH and H2O–Me2CO extracts of G. collinum and A. asiatica showed a reliable correlation with their contents of phenolic compounds.

Keywords

medicinal plants antioxidant activity phenolic compounds flavonoids 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. A. Sapko
    • 1
  • O. V. Chebonenko
    • 1
  • A. Sh. Utarbaeva
    • 1
  • A. Zh. Amirkulova
    • 1
  • A. K. Tursunova
    • 1
  1. 1.M. A. Aitkhozhin Institute of Molecular Biology and BiochemistryMinistry of Education and Science, Republic of Kazakhstan Science CommitteeAlmatyKazakhstan

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