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Becoming Conversant by Learning to Listen: A Reading of T. M. Luhrmann’s When God Talks Back: Understanding the American Evangelical Relationship with God

Abstract

This review considers T. M. Luhrmann’s ethnographic findings on contemporary evangelical Christian practices and her aim to bridge the “rift between believers and non-believers.” Luhrmann’s portrayal of these practices stems from current research within evolutionary psychology, sociology, and the neurosciences on consciousness and religiosity. Depth Psychology and aspects of non-affiliated, lived religions that cultivate such “experiences of mind” are also considered.

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Correspondence to Dan Smyer Yu.

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Smyer Yu, D., Smyer Yu, W. Becoming Conversant by Learning to Listen: A Reading of T. M. Luhrmann’s When God Talks Back: Understanding the American Evangelical Relationship with God . Pastoral Psychol 63, 223–228 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11089-013-0531-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11089-013-0531-y

Keywords

  • Evangelical Christianity
  • Lived religion
  • Theory of mind
  • Belief
  • Interfaith dialogue