Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 105–112 | Cite as

Engaging in Grief Ministry in Multireligious Contexts

Review of Melissa M. Kelley’s Grief: Contemporary Theory and the Practice of Ministry (2010)
Article

References

  1. Bender, C., & Cadge, W. (2006). Constructing Buddhism(s): Interreligious dialogue and religious hybridity Sociology of Religion, 67(3), 229–247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bliatout, B. T. (1993). Hmong death customs: Traditional and acculturated. In D. P. Irish, K. F. Lundquist, & V. J. Nelsen (Eds.), Ethnic variations in dying, death, and grief (pp. 79–100). Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  3. Bragt, J. V. (2002). Multiple religious belonging of the Japanese people In C. Cornille (Ed.), Many mansions? Multiple religious belonging and Christian identity (pp. 7–19). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock.Google Scholar
  4. Castle, J., & Phillips, W. L. (2003). Grief rituals: Aspects that facilitate adjustment to bereavement. Journal of Loss and Trauma, 8, 41–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chugainippoh (2011). Tohoku daishinsai kyodan Anketo. Trans. C. Saito http://www.chugainippoh.co.jp/higashinihon/sinsai01.html. Accessed 5 Nov 2012.
  6. Cornille, C. (2002). Introduction: The dynamics of multiple belonging In C. Cornille (Ed.), Many mansions? Multiple religious belonging and Christian identity (pp. 1–6). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock.Google Scholar
  7. DeSpelder, L. A. (1998). Developing cultural competency. In K. J. Doka & J. D. Davidson (Eds.), Living with grief: Who we are, how we grieve (pp. 97–106). Washington, DC: Hospice Foundation of America.Google Scholar
  8. Eck, D. L. (2001). A new religious America: How a “Christian country” has now become the world’s most religiously diverse nation. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco.Google Scholar
  9. Fukko wa Chinkon no hibiki to tomoni (Trans. C. Saito). Nikkei Business, March 12, 2012, pp. 27–29.Google Scholar
  10. Goss, R. E., & Klass, D. E. (2005). Dead but not lost: Grief narratives in religious traditions. Walnut Creek: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  11. Greider, K. J. (2010). Soul-care amid religious plurality: Excavating an emerging dimension of multicultural challenge and competence. In J. Stevenson-Moesssner & T. Snorton (Eds.), Women out of order: Risking change and creating care in a multicultural world (pp. 293–313). Minneapolis: Fortress Press.Google Scholar
  12. Institute for Japanese Culture and Classics (1998). Tama. In Basic Terms of Shinto, Kokugakuin University. Revised ed. http://www2.kokugakuin.ac.jp/ijcc/. Accessed 5 November 2012.
  13. Irish, D. P., Lundquist, K. F., & Nelson, V. J. (1993). Ethnic variations in dying, death, and grief: Diversity in universality. Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  14. Japan Fire and Disaster Management Agency (February 2012), A report on the total damage of the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku (Tōhoku-chihō Taiheiyō Oki Jishin ni tsuite. No.144). http://www.fdma.go.jp/bn/higaihou_past_jishin_2401.html. Accessed 5 November 2012.
  15. Kelley, M. M. (2010). Grief: Contemporary theory and the practice of ministry. Minneapolis: Fortress Press.Google Scholar
  16. Klass, D. (1996). Grief in an Eastern Culture: Japanese ancestor worship. In D. Klass, P. R. Silverman, & S. L. Nickman (Eds.), Continuing bonds: New understandings of grief (pp. 59–70). Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  17. Klass, D., & Chow, A. Y. M. (2011). Culture and ethnicity in experiencing, policing, and handling grief. In R. A. Neimeyer, D. L. Harris, H. R. Winokuer, & G. F. Thornton (Eds.), Grief and bereavement in contemporary society: Bridging research and practice (pp. 341–353). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  18. Klass, D., & Goss, R. E. (1998). Asian ways of grief. In K. J. Doka & J. D. Davidson (Eds.), Living with grief: Who we are, how we grieve (pp. 13–26). Washington, DC: Hospice Foundation of America.Google Scholar
  19. Lartey, E. Y. (2002). Pastoral counseling in multi-cultural contexts. American Journal of Pastoral Counseling, 12(1), 317–329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Lartey, E. Y. (2006). Pastoral theology in an intercultural world. Cleveland: Pilgrim Press.Google Scholar
  21. Neimeyer, R. A. (Ed.). (2001). Meaning reconstruction and the experience of loss. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  22. Parry, J. K., & Ryan, A. S. (1995). A cross-cultural look at death, dying, and religion. Chicago: Nelson Hall.Google Scholar
  23. Rosenblatt, P. C. (1993). Cross-cultural variation in the experience, expression, and understanding of grief. In D. P. Irish, K. F. Lundquist, & V. J. Nelsen (Eds.), Ethnic variations in dying, death, and grief (pp. 13–19). Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  24. Silverman, P. R., & Klass, D. (1996). Introduction: What’s the problem? In D. Klass, P. R. Silverman, & S. L. Nickman (Eds.), Continuing bonds: New understandings of grief (pp. 3–27). Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  25. Solomon, R. (2002). The future landscape of pastoral care and counseling in the Asia Pacific region. American Journal of Pastoral Counseling, 5(1–2), 99–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Wallace, B. R. (2010). A womanist legacy of trauma, grief, and loss: Reframing the notion of the strong black woman icon. In J. S. Moesssner & T. Snorton (Eds.), Women out of order: Risking change and creating care in a multicultural world (pp. 43–56). Minneapolis: Fortress Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social System StudiesDoshisha Women’s College of Liberal ArtsKyotoJapan

Personalised recommendations