Pastoral Psychology

, 60:809 | Cite as

Intimate Violence Against Women: Trajectories for Pastoral Care in a New Millennium

Article

Abstract

This article reviews progress made in the theory and practice of pastoral care and counseling with regard to the issue of intimate violence against women since the 1970’s. It includes a comprehensive survey of sociological, psychological, and pastoral literature, and a summary of research on teaching about domestic violence in mainline Protestant seminaries. Social and theological themes, including gender, power, and social and political context, and the challenges of justice-making are traced historically. The article concludes with new recommendations for churches, pastoral caregivers, counselors, and theologians.

Keywords

Intimate partner violence Domestic violence Abuse Pastoral Care Pastoral Counseling Literature review Women Christian counseling 

References

*note: All websites cited were active and available as of April, 2011, unless otherwise noted.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ben G. and Nancye Clapp Gautier Professor of Pastoral Theology, Care, and CounselingColumbia Theological SeminaryDecaturUSA

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