Asian Medicine and Holistic Aging

Abstract

This article introduces a holistic model of care for the elderly from the perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a body-spirit-social-environment perspective, deeply influenced by Chinese religions, which laid the foundation of Chinese health beliefs and practices. The author evaluates practices that promote health, longevity, and quality of life, and support end of life care. Insights address care for Chinese and other ethnic Asian older adults.

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Correspondence to Kwang-hee Park.

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Park, Kh. Asian Medicine and Holistic Aging. Pastoral Psychol 60, 73–83 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11089-010-0305-8

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Keywords

  • Holistic care
  • Older adults
  • Traditional Chinese medicine
  • Pastoral care