Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 57, Issue 1–2, pp 25–44 | Cite as

Different Subjects: Postmodern Selves in Psychology and Religion

Article

Abstract

This paper explores the postmodern suspicion toward the notion of a unified self in light of the scholarship of Michel Foucault and Michel Certeau. Foucault’s analysis critiques modern subjectivity by highlighting the dangers of the human sciences and the pastoral power of Christianity. His ethical alternative of re-appropriating classical concepts of caring for the self is intriguing but remains unfinished after Foucault’s death. Drawing on Foucault’s ideas, Certeau articulated alternative psychoanalytic and Christian mystical perspectives that describe human subjectivity based not on unity, rationality, and universality but on multiplicity, myth, and possibility.

Keywords

Subjectivity Foucault Certeau Mysticism Psychoanalysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Candler School of Theology of Emory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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