Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 54, Issue 1, pp 61–72 | Cite as

History and Method of Charles V. Gerkin’s Pastoral Theology: Toward an Identity-Embodied and Community-Embedded Pastoral Theology, Part II. Method

Article

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to explore the legacy of Charles V. Gerkin’s pastoral theology and to construct a method of pastoral theology. In Part I, I will trace within a larger context of pastoral theology the history of Gerkin’s pastoral theology since his early clinical praxis. In Part II, I will explore his method of developing pastoral theology and construct a renewed critical and constructive method of pastoral theology, reflecting on the implications of exploring the history and method of his pastoral theology.

Keywords

practical theology identity and community praxis as practice and reflection lived experience and story hermeneutic 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Brite Divinity SchoolTexas Christian UniversityFort Worth

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