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FEMA versus local governments: influence and reliance in disaster preparedness

Abstract

This study uses an experimental approach to examine whether disaster information sourced to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) influences intentions to adopt hazard adjustments. Survey questions are also used to determine whether individuals rely more on FEMA or local governments when preparing for disasters. Using an online sample of 2008 US employees, the results indicate that information sourced to FEMA is no more influential than information sourced to local governments and that individuals rely less on FEMA than on local agencies during disaster preparedness. These results have significant implications for practice and future research on natural hazard preparedness.

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Notes

  1. AAPOR’s Response Rate 3, or RR3, was used and calculated by dividing the 2008 interviews by the sum of 2026 known eligible cases plus 2192 estimated eligible cases among the 5480 who did not respond to the survey invitations (assuming an estimated eligibility rate of 40 %, based on the eligibility rate of the 5079 responders).

  2. The other known studies that took the employee approach are Fowler et al. (2007) and Larson and Fowler (2009).

  3. We presented information on the major organizational sectors only.

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Correspondence to Abdul-Akeem Sadiq.

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Sadiq, AA., Tharp, K. & Graham, J.D. FEMA versus local governments: influence and reliance in disaster preparedness. Nat Hazards 82, 123–138 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-016-2183-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-016-2183-6

Keywords

  • Natural hazards
  • Disasters
  • FEMA
  • Preparedness
  • Local government
  • Experiment