Neurochemical Research

, Volume 36, Issue 6, pp 1124–1128 | Cite as

TOMM40 poly-T Variants and Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta Levels in the Elderly

  • Nunzio Pomara
  • Davide Bruno
  • Jay J. Nierenberg
  • John J. Sidtis
  • Frank T. Martiniuk
  • Pankaj D. Mehta
  • Henrik Zetterberg
  • Kaj Blennow
Original Paper

Abstract

A variable poly-T polymorphism in the TOMM40 gene, which is in linkage disequilibrium with APOE, was recently implicated with increased risk and earlier onset age for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in APOE ε3 carriers. To elucidate potential neurobiological mechanisms underlying this association, we compared the effect of TOMM40 poly-T variants to the effect of APOE, an established LOAD-risk modulator, on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid beta (Aβ) and tau levels, in cognitively intact elderly subjects. APOE ε4 carriers showed significant reductions in Aβ 1-42 levels compared to non-ε4 carriers, but no differences were detected across TOMM40 variants. Neither Aβ 1-40 nor tau levels were affected by APOE or TOMM40.

Keywords

TOMM40 poly-T APOE Cerebrospinal fluid Amyloid beta T tau P tau Alzheimer’s disease 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nunzio Pomara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Davide Bruno
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jay J. Nierenberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • John J. Sidtis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Frank T. Martiniuk
    • 2
  • Pankaj D. Mehta
    • 3
  • Henrik Zetterberg
    • 4
  • Kaj Blennow
    • 4
  1. 1.Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric ResearchOrangeburgUSA
  2. 2.New York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.NYS Institute for Basic ResearchStaten IslandUSA
  4. 4.Neurochemistry LabSahlgrenska University HospitalGothenburgSweden

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