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Antiparkinsonian Effects of Aqueous Methanolic Extract of Hyoscyamus niger Seeds Result From its Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory and Hydroxyl Radical Scavenging Potency

Abstract

Hyoscyamus species is one of the four plants used in Ayurveda for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Since Hyoscyamusniger was found to contain negligible levels of L-DOPA, we evaluated neuroprotective potential, if any, of characterized petroleum ether and aqueous methanol extracts of its seeds in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD in mice. Air dried authenticated H. niger seeds were sequentially extracted using petroleum ether and aqueous methanol and were characterized employing HPLC-electrochemistry and LCMS. Parkinsonian mice were treated daily twice with the extracts (125–500 mg/kg, p.o.) for two days and motor functions and striatal dopamine levels were assayed. Administration of the aqueous methanol extract (containing 0.03% w/w of L-DOPA), but not petroleum ether extract, significantly attenuated motor disabilities (akinesia, catalepsy and reduced swim score) and striatal dopamine loss in MPTP treated mice. Since the extract caused significant inhibition of monoamine oxidase activity and attenuated 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP+)-induced hydroxyl radical (·OH) generation in isolated mitochondria, it is possible that the methanolic extract of Hyoscyamusniger seeds protects against parkinsonism in mice by means of its ability to inhibit increased ·OH generated in the mitochondria.

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Acknowledgments

T Sengupta is a recipient of junior and senior research fellowships from the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR), Govt of India.

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Correspondence to K. P. Mohanakumar.

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Sengupta, T., Vinayagam, J., Nagashayana, N. et al. Antiparkinsonian Effects of Aqueous Methanolic Extract of Hyoscyamus niger Seeds Result From its Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory and Hydroxyl Radical Scavenging Potency. Neurochem Res 36, 177–186 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11064-010-0289-x

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Keywords

  • Ayurveda
  • Anti-parkinsonian activity
  • MAO-B inhibitor
  • Antioxidant
  • Hydroxyl radical
  • Akinesia
  • Catalepsy
  • Swim score