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Neurochemical Research

, Volume 32, Issue 1, pp 81–85 | Cite as

NCS-1 Expression in Rat Brain after Electroconvulsive Stimulation

  • Daniela V. F. Rosa
  • Renan P. Souza
  • Bruno R. Souza
  • Bernardo S. Motta
  • Fernando Caetano
  • Luciano K. Jornada
  • Gustavo Feier
  • Andreas Jeromin
  • Marcus V. Gomez
  • João Quevedo
  • Marco A. Romano-SilvaEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been used as a treatment for mental disorder since 1930s, little progress has been made towards understanding the mechanisms underlying its therapeutic and adverse effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the expression of NCS-1 (neuronal calcium sensor 1, a protein that was found to be altered in post-mortem prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients) in striatum, cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of Wistar rats after acute or chronic electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS). Rats were submitted to a single stimulation (acute) or to a series of eight stimulations, applied one every 48 h (chronic). Animals were killed for collection of tissue samples at time zero, 30 min, 3, 12, 24 and 48 h after stimulation in the acute model and at the same time intervals after the last stimulation in the chronic model. Our results indicated that chronic ECS increased the expression of NCS-1 only in cerebellum. Such results on the expression of proteins involved in signaling pathways that are relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders and treatment, in particular ECT, can contribute to shed light on the mechanisms related to therapeutic and adverse effects.

Keywords

Electroconvulsive therapy NCS-1 Electroconvulsive stimulation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by grants from CNPq, FAPESC, Instituto Cérebro e Mente and UNESC to J. Quevedo; MVG and MAR-S are CNPq research fellows and RPS, BSM, FSC are holders of CNPq studentships and DVFR and BRS are holders of CAPESstudentships. Financial support from CNPq Universal grantproc. #471837/2004–0, Programa Institutos do Milênio/CNPq/FINEP andFAPEMIG # CBB-453/04

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniela V. F. Rosa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Renan P. Souza
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bruno R. Souza
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bernardo S. Motta
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fernando Caetano
    • 1
    • 2
  • Luciano K. Jornada
    • 3
  • Gustavo Feier
    • 3
  • Andreas Jeromin
    • 4
  • Marcus V. Gomez
    • 2
  • João Quevedo
    • 3
  • Marco A. Romano-Silva
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Grupo de Pesquisa em Neuropsiquiatria Clínica e Molecular, ICBUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo Horizonte Brazil
  2. 2.Departamento de Farmacologia – ICBUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  3. 3.Laboratório de Neurociências, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da SaúdeUniversidade do Extremo Sul CatarinenseCriciumaBrazil
  4. 4.Center for Learning and MemoryUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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