Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 112, Issue 1, pp 99–106

Disability, body image and sports/physical activity in adult survivors of childhood CNS tumors: population-based outcomes from a cohort study

  • Krister K. Boman
  • Lina Hörnquist
  • Lisanne De Graaff
  • Jenny Rickardsson
  • Birgitta Lannering
  • Göran Gustafsson
Clinical Study

DOI: 10.1007/s11060-012-1039-5

Cite this article as:
Boman, K.K., Hörnquist, L., De Graaff, L. et al. J Neurooncol (2013) 112: 99. doi:10.1007/s11060-012-1039-5

Abstract

Childhood CNS tumor survivors risk health and functional impairments that threaten normal psychological development and self-perception. This study investigated the extent to which health and functional ability predict adult survivors’ body image (BI) and self-confidence regarding sports and physical activity. The study cohort covered 708 eligible ≥18 year old CNS tumor survivors, and data from 528 (75 %) were analyzed. Disability was estimated using the Health Utilities Index™ Mark2/3, a multidimensional self-report instrument. Physical self-confidence in terms of BI and sports/physical activity-related self-confidence (SPAS) were assessed using the BI and the Sports/Athletics modules of a standardized self-report assessment scale. In adjusted regression models, global health and functional status (GHFS) predicted BI (B = 0.94, 95 % CI 0.69–1.19) and SPAS (B = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.55–1.04). Emotion and pain, and to a lesser degree cognition, speech and vision disability, were associated with poorer BI and SPAS. Gender, sub-diagnosis, and time since diagnosis influenced the relationship between health status and physical self-confidence outcomes. Females had poorer GHFS, BI and SPAS than males. Decreased health and functional ability following childhood CNS cancer intrudes on physical self-confidence, with females being at heightened risk for both disability and negative self-confidence. Identified disability and gender-related risk calls for a follow-up plan that integrates treatment of psychological sequelae in lifetime monitoring of childhood CNS tumor survivors to restore and protect self-image and self-confidence, essential mental health correlates. An expanded plan should recognize the need for such services, optimizing life-long quality of survival for CNS tumor survivors.

Keywords

Childhood CNS tumors Adult survivors Late effects follow-up Body image Self-confidence Sports activities 

Supplementary material

11060_2012_1039_MOESM1_ESM.doc (80 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 79 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Krister K. Boman
    • 1
  • Lina Hörnquist
    • 1
  • Lisanne De Graaff
    • 2
  • Jenny Rickardsson
    • 1
  • Birgitta Lannering
    • 3
  • Göran Gustafsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s HealthKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Faculty of Medicine, Academic Medical CentreUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatric OncologyUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden

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