East-Central Europe in comparative literature studies: introduction

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Special thanks must be expressed to the chief organisers Ágnes Klára Papp and Csaba Horváth.

  2. 2.

    For Neohelicon’s commitment to cherish the local-regional traditions of comparative literature see Hajdu (2008). For the importance of Acta Comparationis Litterarum Universarum for the formation of the discipline see Damrosch (2006). The journal’s achievement tends to be attributed to Hugó Meltzl alone, but for the crucial role the other editor Sámuel Brassai played in its history see T. Szabó (2013).

  3. 3.

    For a typology of borders see Fludernik (1999).

  4. 4.

    As a true comparatist, Gvozden refers to the original Serbian texts, but for those who are not familiar with that language, they are available among others in English, French, and German translation as well, see Kiš (1982, 1988, 1990), Tišma (1986, 1995, 2016).

  5. 5.

    E.g. the chapter on the “Topographies and literary cultures in Budapest” by John Neubauer and Mihály Szegedy-Maszák contains a two-page description of the Jewish culture in Budapest, which, although not an individual subchapter as those on the Serb or Slovak constituents of the city, is not shorter than those (Neubauer and Szegedy-Maszák 2006, pp. 169–170).

  6. 6.

    The review is analysed from a different viewpoint in Dávidházi (2003).

  7. 7.

    E.g. “In the sense of an infection that corrupts morally and debilitates physically, syphilis was to become a standard trope in late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth century anti-Semitic polemics” (Sontag 1977, p. 59).

  8. 8.

    For the image of Kállay’s achievement in Hungarian literature see Hajdu (2007).

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Acknowledgements

Funding was provided by the project “Remapping World Literature against the Background of the ‘Belt and Road’ Initiative” granted by Guangdong Education Department (2017WZDXM035).

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Hajdu, P. East-Central Europe in comparative literature studies: introduction. Neohelicon 47, 595–601 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11059-020-00556-9

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