Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 55–60 | Cite as

Analysis of the toxicity of gold nano particles on the immune system: effect on dendritic cell functions

  • Christian L. Villiers
  • Heidi Freitas
  • Rachel Couderc
  • Marie-Bernadette Villiers
  • Patrice N. Marche
Special focus: Safety of Nanoparticles

Abstract

The effect of manufactured gold nanoparticles (NPs) on the immune system was analysed through their ability to perturb the functions of dendritic cells (DCs), a major actor of both innate and acquired immune responses. For this purpose, DCs were produced in culture from mouse bone marrow progenitors. The analysis of the viability of the cells after their incubation in the presence of gold NPs shows that these NPs are not cytotoxics even at high concentration. Furthermore, the phenotype of the DC is unchanged after the addition of NPs, indicating that there is no activation of the DC. However, the analysis of the cells at the intracellular level reveals important amounts of gold NPs amassing in endocytic compartments. Furthermore, the secretion of cytokines is significantly modified after such internalisation indicating a potential perturbation of the immune response.

Keywords

Nanoparticles Gold Immune system Dendritic cells Cytotoxicity Cytokine Nanomedicine EHS 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian L. Villiers
    • 1
    • 2
  • Heidi Freitas
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rachel Couderc
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marie-Bernadette Villiers
    • 1
    • 2
  • Patrice N. Marche
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Inserm, U823, Centre de Recherche Albert BonniotGrenobleFrance
  2. 2.Université Joseph FourierGrenobleFrance

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