Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 643–651 | Cite as

Cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects of nano-C60 on tumor cells in vitro

  • Jin Ni
  • Qiuye Wu
  • Yuguo Li
  • Zhixin Guo
  • Gusheng Tang
  • Ding Sun
  • Fu Gao
  • Jianming Cai
Research Paper

Abstract

There is growing evidence in recent years that the pristine fullerene may be endowed with strong pro-oxidant capacity to biological samples. In this investigation we tested the hypothesis that water-soluble fullerene-C60 (nano-C60) may interact with ionizing radiation enhancing its antiproliferative effects. The two tumor cell lines with different radiosensitivity B16 and SMMU-7721 were treated by a combination of pristine fullerene and 60Co γ irradiation. We measured cell survival rates, apoptotic characteristics, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and alteration of cell diameter with or without γ-irradiation. There was reduced survival with B16 and SMMU-7721 cells exposed to nano-C60, with the inhibitory concentrations reducing the viability by 50% to 65 part per billion (ppb) and 150 ppb respectively. For cells exposed to nano-C60 prior to γ-irradiation, damage to cell membranes and increased numbers of apoptotic cells were detected by morphologic Hoechst-staining analysis and Annexin V/propidium iodide double-staining. In cells exposed to nano-C60, there were increased levels of ROS, as measured by fluorescence detection under laser confocal microscopy. Preincubation with non-toxic pristine C60 before γ-ray caused enlargement of cells with increased diameter. The results show that nano-C60 inhibits the growth of tumor cells at certain concentrations and increases the effects of 60Co γ-irradiation, possibly through the elevated production of cellular ROS and the membrane disruption. Data in this study indicates a possible consideration of using C60 as a candidate of sensitization modifier in tumor radiation biology.

Keywords

Nano-C60 60Co γ-irradiation Cytotoxicity ROS Radiosensitization Nanomedicine Health implications 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jin Ni
    • 1
  • Qiuye Wu
    • 2
  • Yuguo Li
    • 3
  • Zhixin Guo
    • 4
  • Gusheng Tang
    • 1
  • Ding Sun
    • 1
  • Fu Gao
    • 1
  • Jianming Cai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiation MedicineSecond Military Medical UniversityShanghaiP.R. China
  2. 2.Organic Chemistry Department, School of PharmacySecond Military Medical UniversityShanghaiP.R. China
  3. 3.Lab of Nanoscale Biomedicine Shanghai Institute of Applied PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiP.R. China
  4. 4.Institute of ChemistryChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP.R. China

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