Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 959–964 | Cite as

Poly(allylamine) Stabilized Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles

  • Jouliana M. El Khoury
  • Daniela Caruntu
  • Charles J. O’ Connor
  • Kwang-Un Jeong
  • Stephen Z. D. Cheng
  • Jun Hu
Brief Communication

Abstract

This paper describes a new method for the dispersing and surface-functionalization of metal oxide magnetic nanoparticles (10 nm) with poly(allylamine) (PAA). In this approach, Fe3O4 nanoparticles, prepared with diethanolamine (DEA) as the surface capping agent in diethyleneglycol (DEG) and methanol, are ligand exchanged with PAA. This method allows the dispersing of magnetic nanoparticles into individual or small clusters of 2–5 nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. The resulting nanoparticles are water soluble and stable for months. The PAA stabilized Fe3O4 nanoparticles are characterized by TEM, TGA, and FT-IR. The PAA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles will allow further chemical tailoring and engineering of their surfaces for biomedical applications.

Keywords

iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles poly(allylamine) polymer coating particle dispersion surface modification clusters colloids biomedical applications 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jouliana M. El Khoury
    • 1
  • Daniela Caruntu
    • 1
  • Charles J. O’ Connor
    • 1
  • Kwang-Un Jeong
    • 2
  • Stephen Z. D. Cheng
    • 2
  • Jun Hu
    • 3
  1. 1.Advanced Materials Research InstituteUniversity of New OrleansNew OrleansUSA
  2. 2.Department of Polymer ScienceThe University of AkronAkronUSA
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryThe University of AkronAkronUSA

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