Mycopathologia

, Volume 183, Issue 3, pp 615–618 | Cite as

Fatal Talaromyces marneffei Infection in a Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis

  • Sally C. Y. Wong
  • Siddharth Sridhar
  • Antonio H. Y. Ngan
  • Jonathan H. K. Chen
  • Rosana W. S. Poon
  • Susanna K. P. Lau
  • Patrick C. Y. Woo
Short Communication
  • 84 Downloads

Abstract

Talaromyces marneffei, previously known as Penicillium marneffei, is the most important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. Traditionally, T. marneffei infection in human was mainly associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome caused by HIV infection. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of T. marneffei infections reported in non-HIV-infected patients with other immunocompromised conditions, including autoantibodies against interferon-gamma, systemic lupus erythematosis, solid organ transplantation, Job’s syndrome, hematological malignancies, and use of novel targeted therapies. In this article, we describe the first case of fatal T. marneffei infection in a patient with underlying autoimmune hepatitis, presented as fever without localizing features. The diagnosis of talaromycosis was confirmed with the identification of the fungi isolated from the blood culture specimen by conventional methods and using matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This case shows the importance of a high index of suspicion, particularly for such a highly fatal but potentially treatable fungal infection.

Keywords

Talaromyces marneffei Fatal infection Autoimmune hepatitis Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was partly supported by the Health and Medical Research Fund [No. HKM-15-M07 (commissioned project)], Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong, and the Strategic Research Theme Fund of The University of Hong Kong.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally C. Y. Wong
    • 1
  • Siddharth Sridhar
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Antonio H. Y. Ngan
    • 1
  • Jonathan H. K. Chen
    • 1
  • Rosana W. S. Poon
    • 1
  • Susanna K. P. Lau
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Patrick C. Y. Woo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary HospitalThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious DiseasesThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  3. 3.Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of MedicineThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina

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