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Detecting Hot Road Mobility of Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

Abstract

Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs) can provide value-added services to both drivers and passengers with on-board vehicular communication systems. Node mobility and volatile wireless connection in VANETs affect inter-contact time (T I ) between mobile nodes, which greatly degrades the performance of vehicular applications. Nevertheless, the node spatial distribution in VANETs is another important factor especially in real applications. It positively affects the inter-contact time of vehicular nodes. By leveraging it, we can significantly improve the performance of data transmissions and inter-vehicle communication. To this end, we investigate the data collected from around 4,000 taxisin Shanghai and propose in this paper an efficient hot road mobility model. We find that most taxis distribute on some hot roads, which makes the node spatial distribution follow the power law. Based on this observation, we propose the concepts of indirect contact and heterogeneous inter-contact time (T H ) to reveal how hot roads can change the distribution of inter-contact time. We find that the tail distribution of T H also appears the power law, and both node spatial distribution and T H distribution decay at least as the power law. We further propose a model for detecting vehicle mobility in hot roads, which can generates synthetic traces that captures both spatial and temporal features of nodes in VANETs.

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Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61103185, 61100034, 61003247 and 60902053), the Natural Science Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province (Grant No. 11KJB520009), the Natural Science Foundation Project of Chongqing (Grant No. CSTC 2010BB2210), the 51st Chinese Postdoc Science Foundation (Grant No. 2012M510932) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant No. 106112013CDJZR180004).

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Correspondence to Hongyu Huang.

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Zhang, D., Huang, H., Zhou, J. et al. Detecting Hot Road Mobility of Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks. Mobile Netw Appl 18, 803–813 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11036-013-0467-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11036-013-0467-6

Keywords

  • Vehicular Ad Hoc networks
  • Hot roads
  • Mobility
  • Mobile networks