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Association between glutathione S-transferases P1 Ile105Val polymorphism and susceptibility to esophageal cancer: evidence from 20 case–control studies

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Abstract

Available epidemiological studies had estimated the correlation between glutathione S-transferases P1 (GSTP1) Ile105Val polymorphism and esophageal cancer (EC) risk. However, the conclusions were controversial and inconclusive. An updated meta-analysis was conducted to explore whether GSTP1 polymorphism could be contributed to the EC risk. Ultimately, a total of 2,992 cases and 4,758 controls from 20 previous studies were included. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were used to assess the strength of the associations. Pooled results suggested that GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism significantly increased the risk of developing EC in Caucasians under three genetic models (G vs. A, OR 1.146, 95 % CI 1.031–1.275, P = 0.012, I2 = 30.40 %; GA vs. AA, OR 1.208, 95 % CI 1.036–1.408, P = 0.016, I2 = 50.30 %; GG+GA vs. AA, OR 1.219, 95 % CI 1.053–1.410, P = 0.008, I2 = 44.50 %). However, no significant correlation was found in Asians, African and mixed ethnicities analyses. Moreover, similar results were detected for any genetic model in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and esophageal adenocarcinoma when stratifying for pathologic types. This meta-analysis provides new evidences that GSTP1 Ile105Val gene polymorphism contributes to EC susceptibility in Caucasians.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Guangxi scientific research and technology development Project (No. 10124001A-47).

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Correspondence to Mingwu Chen.

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Tan, X., Chen, M. Association between glutathione S-transferases P1 Ile105Val polymorphism and susceptibility to esophageal cancer: evidence from 20 case–control studies. Mol Biol Rep 42, 399–408 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11033-014-3781-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11033-014-3781-6

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