Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 81–85 | Cite as

Increased serum interleukin 17 in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

  • Xue-Fei Zhao
  • Hai-Feng Pan
  • Hui Yuan
  • Wen-Hui Zhang
  • Xiang-Pei Li
  • Gui-Hong Wang
  • Guo-Cui Wu
  • Hong Su
  • Fa-Ming Pan
  • Wen-Xian Li
  • Lian-Hong Li
  • Guo-Ping Chen
  • Dong-Qing Ye
Article

Abstract

Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a Th17 cytokine associated with inflammation, autoimmunity and defense against some bacteria, it has been implicated in many chronic autoimmune diseases including psoriasis, multiple sclerosis and systemic sclerosis. However, whether IL-17 plays a role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the serum IL-17 level in patients with SLE and it’s associations with disease manifestations and activity. Fifty-seven patients with SLE and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited. Serum IL-17 levels were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistic analyzes were performed by SPSS 10.01. Results show that serum IL-17 levels were significantly elevated in SLE patients as compared with normal controls. Nevertheless, no associations of serum IL-17 level with clinical and laboratory parameters were found; no significant difference regarding serum IL-17 level between SLE patients with nephritis and those without nephritis was found; no significant difference was found between Less active SLE and More active SLE; Correlation analysis between serum IL-17 levels and SLEDAI showed no association. Taken together, our results indicate increased serum IL-17 levels in SLE patients, suggesting that this cytokine may trigger the inflammatory process in SLE. However, no associations of serum IL-17 level with disease manifestations were found. Therefore, further studies are required to confirm this preliminary data.

Keywords

Interleukin 17 Systemic lupus erythematosus 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xue-Fei Zhao
    • 1
  • Hai-Feng Pan
    • 1
  • Hui Yuan
    • 1
  • Wen-Hui Zhang
    • 1
  • Xiang-Pei Li
    • 2
  • Gui-Hong Wang
    • 2
  • Guo-Cui Wu
    • 3
  • Hong Su
    • 1
  • Fa-Ming Pan
    • 1
  • Wen-Xian Li
    • 1
  • Lian-Hong Li
    • 1
  • Guo-Ping Chen
    • 1
  • Dong-Qing Ye
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthAnhui Medical UniversityHefeiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of RheumatologyAnhui Provincial HospitalHefeiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of PharmacologyAnhui Medical UniversityHefeiPeople’s Republic of China

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