The implications of need-satisfying work climates on state mindfulness in a longitudinal analysis of work outcomes

Abstract

Literature on mindfulness in the workplace is scarce, and the antecedents of state mindfulness are not understood. This study sought to investigate antecedents and outcomes of state mindfulness in a self-determination theory model in the work domain. Specifically, the present study contributes to an understanding of mindfulness by examining the implications of managerial need support and subsequent need satisfaction on state mindfulness, as well as outcomes of state mindfulness among employees. Results from a longitudinal analysis using data from four time points over 15 months supported the prediction that a need-supportive work climate related positively to state mindfulness through satisfaction of basic psychological needs. Furthermore, higher levels of state mindfulness had positive implications on subjective well-being as well as work-related outcomes. Specifically, the results showed a positive relation to subjective well-being and goal attainment, while a negative relation to burnout. Lastly, need satisfaction had an indirect relation to these outcomes through state mindfulness. These findings contribute to creating a link between the literature showing the importance of need-supportive work climates for well-being and other work-related outcomes, and the emerging literature on the positive benefits of mindfulness in organizational settings.

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Acknowledgment

The author thanks Hallgeir Halvari and Christopher P. Niemiec for their helpful comments on earlier drafts.

Funding

This research is a part of a project supported by a grant from Buskerud University College Research Program in Management.

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Correspondence to Anja H. Olafsen.

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The data collection was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services and participation was voluntary. This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

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Olafsen, A.H. The implications of need-satisfying work climates on state mindfulness in a longitudinal analysis of work outcomes. Motiv Emot 41, 22–37 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11031-016-9592-4

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Keywords

  • Self-determination theory
  • Managerial need support
  • Basic psychological need satisfaction
  • State mindfulness
  • Subjective well-being
  • Goal attainment
  • Burnout